Courses

Courses by semester

Courses for Fall 2022

Complete Cornell University course descriptions are in the Courses of Study .

Course ID Title Offered
ARTH1100 Art Histories: An Introduction This lecture course introduces students to the History of Art as a global and interdisciplinary field. Team-taught by a selection of professors from the department, in collaboration with members of the staff and faculty of the Herbert Johnson Museum of Art, its primary aim is to familiarize students with the most significant geographical areas, epochs and works of art, as well as with methods employed in their study and analysis. The course will be organized around a changing selection of themes central to the history of art. The theme for fall 2021 is "Ornament," departing from a broad understanding of just what constitutes a work of art (in addition to painting, sculpture, and architecture, we will consider a range of objects of material culture, from ceramics to metalwork to the human body itself), paying particular attention to intersections of aesthetics and utility, and the attitudes of various cultures, from antiquity to the present, toward adornment and its interpretation.

Full details for ARTH 1100 - Art Histories: An Introduction

Fall.
ARTH1173 FWS: Portraiture How does one capture the likeness of an individual? What purposes do portraits serve, and by which criteria may they be judged? Are there aspects of a person that elude representation? We will pose these questions of both artistic and literary portraits, and seek answers by writing about portraits here at Cornell: in our museums, libraries, and around campus.

Full details for ARTH 1173 - FWS: Portraiture

Fall.
ARTH1174 FWS: Photographs and Text Like the right Instagram filter, writing can change the way a photograph impacts its viewer. This course touches on some of photography's key histories and concerns to improve the way students write with images. By making something appear, a photograph wields great power on a screen or printed page. Writers not only elegantly describe photographs, but mine, subvert, and silence images with text. Class sessions will cover topics related to conceptual art, the documentary tradition, fourth-wave feminism, and postcolonial theory to interrogate photography's possibilities against the writer's responsibilities.

Full details for ARTH 1174 - FWS: Photographs and Text

Fall.
ARTH2200 Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects Why are the most famous ancient Greek vases found in Italy? What was the "worlds' first computer" used for? What can a brick tell us about still standing Roman buildings? What is "classical" about all this and why should we care? This course on the art and archaeology of ancient Greece and Rome will address all these questions. Covering the time span from the

Full details for ARTH 2200 - Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects

Fall.
ARTH3250 Introduction to Dendrochronology Introduction and training in dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) and its applications in archaeology, art history, climate and environment through lab work and participation in ongoing research projects using ancient to modern wood samples from around the world. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. Possibilities exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean, Mexico, and New York State.

Full details for ARTH 3250 - Introduction to Dendrochronology

Fall.
ARTH3565 Art and Architecture of Colonial Latin America This course surveys the artistic and architectural traditions of Latin America during the period of Spanish colonial rule (ca. 1520s-1820s). It will center primarily on visual cultures of the viceroyalties of New Spain (Mexico) and Peru, but will also cover works of art and architecture from the Caribbean and the northern Andes. The course explores the legacy of pre-Columbian visual traditions in the colonial era as well as the lasting impact of colonial artistic practices in modern and contemporary Latin America. It will also examine colonial Latin America as the crossroads of dynamic artistic and cultural interaction between Indigenous, European, and Afrodescendant groups. Topics to be explored include issues of visual translation and transmission, art and agency, and the creation of new colonial artistic practices and idioms.  

Full details for ARTH 3565 - Art and Architecture of Colonial Latin America

Fall.
ARTH3650 History and Theory of Digital Art In this course, we will examine the role of electronic and digital technologies in the arts of the late 20th and 21st centuries with emphasis on Europe and North America. Beginning with the cybernetically and systems-inspired work of the late sixties, we will explore early uses of computer technology, including early experiments in synthetic video in the 1970s. An overview of pre-internet telematic experiments will lead to an investigation of net art and later currents of digital art. The ongoing development of behavioral art forms will be a central theme. Critical evaluation of various attitudes concerning technology will be encouraged.

Full details for ARTH 3650 - History and Theory of Digital Art

Fall.
ARTH3850 The Arts of Southeast Asia The arts of Southeast Asia are studied in their social context, since in traditional societies creative processes are often mapped on the sequence of events that compose human lives. We will be looking particularly at the gendered ways in which bodies are mapped on the land, and how these various framings are often reflected in the unique relationships that emerge between works of art and textual sources. The South Asian epics of the Ramayana (Story of Rama) and the Mahabharata will be explored during the semester as infinitely renewable sources of inspiration.

Full details for ARTH 3850 - The Arts of Southeast Asia

Fall.
ARTH4101 Proseminar: Introduction to Methods Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art", over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. They will be discussed in the framework of institutions, apparatuses and practices that have shaped the field, identifying how these have contributed to systemic mechanisms of hegemony and exclusion. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing and conceptualizing and doing of art history. 

Full details for ARTH 4101 - Proseminar: Introduction to Methods

Fall.
ARTH4110 Curatorial Practicum Topic Fall 2022: Commerce, Currencies, and Commodities: Reconfiguring the Archive

Full details for ARTH 4110 - Curatorial Practicum

Fall.
ARTH4153 Topics in Feminist Media Arts Topic: Feminist Posthumanisms in the Visual Arts.

Full details for ARTH 4153 - Topics in Feminist Media Arts

Fall.
ARTH4171 19th Century Art and Culture An examination and analysis of the major trends in art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Post Impressionism and the dawn of the twentieth century. Lectures and readings will concentrate on the historical context of great masterpieces by seminal artists. The class will investigate the imagery and theoretical foundation of nineteenth-century European and American art using a selection of appropriate methodological approaches. Major figures to be discussed include David, Copley, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Cole, Manet, Morisot, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Rodin, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Part of each class will be devoted to discussions of the readings. Two classes will be held in the National Gallery of Art at times and dates to be determined. Exams, a term paper, and class participation will be used for evaluative purposes.

Full details for ARTH 4171 - 19th Century Art and Culture

Fall, Spring.
ARTH4545 The Photobook Topic for Fall 2022: Tutorial. The history of photography as an art has been mostly on the page, not on the wall.  This course refocuses the standard museum and gallery history of photography back to the book.  Significantly, it takes advantage, through field trips, of the proximity of Cornell to the George Eastman House in Rochester, whose library houses the most important photobooks from around the world, including the best creations from Russia, Japan, and the United States.  Students will learn the basics of photographic printing, book construction, the role of the photobook in the rise of the artist's book in the twentieth century, as well as advanced skills in analysis of the photographic picture and sequencing.  Major themes will include the scientific photobook of the nineteenth century, the documentary photobook of the 1930s, the propaganda photobook of the communist era, the postwar photobooks of Japan, the personal/domestic turn of the 1970s, and the present state of the photobook in the digital era. 

Full details for ARTH 4545 - The Photobook

Fall.
ARTH4556 Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of Resistance in the Americas Exploring a genealogy of Latinx, Afro-Latinx, Black, Indigenous, and Chicana/o/x theorizations of modernity and identity, the course asks, what is the decolonial? Is it a space between the colonial and post-colonial? Is it a creative process, an intellectual theorization, or a historical period? Is it a performance, intervention, or embodied experience? Tracing a historical trajectory of the decolonial in poetry, performance, installation, and visual art, the course examines decolonial modes of making and being from the sixteenth to the twenty first century. 

Full details for ARTH 4556 - Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of Resistance in the Americas

Fall.
ARTH4673 The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration Collaborations among and between Asian and Asian American artists in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have sought to redefine kinship by exploring the politics of belonging, generational dis/connections, and the legacy of the Cold War. Through examining collaborative, multi-media artworks and performances by artists who engage with such questions, this seminar delves into, and expands on, the discourses of transnational and trans-Pacific Asia. With the history of anti-Asian racism and lingering Cold War geopolitics increasingly visible due to Covid-19, students will also critically explore the praxis of reparative kinship, in which settler colonialism and anti-Black racism continue to fracture our work on ecological decolonialization and make alliances against white supremacy fragile. For longer description and instructor bio visit the Society for the Humanities website.

Full details for ARTH 4673 - The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration

Fall.
ARTH4720 Curating the British Empire During Europe's colonial era, the modern museum emerged as a site of cultural and scientific authority. This course investigates the history of imperial collections and collectors, with a focus on Britain and the East India Company in the nineteenth century. Examples of topics include: the "supply chain" for artifacts and knowledge resources; changing conceptions of intellectual property, ownership and access; household versus public versus for-profit collections; museums and the narration of social values and cultural identities; debates over the function or aims of museums and related institutions; the collections and the administration of the empire; the collections and the growth of the sciences; the postcolonial legacies of colonial collections.

Full details for ARTH 4720 - Curating the British Empire

Fall.
ARTH4991 Independent Study Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.

Full details for ARTH 4991 - Independent Study

Fall.
ARTH4998 Honors Work I A course for senior Art History majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the History of Art faculty.

Full details for ARTH 4998 - Honors Work I

Fall, Spring.
ARTH5991 Supervised Reading Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.

Full details for ARTH 5991 - Supervised Reading

Fall.
ARTH5993 Supervised Study Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.

Full details for ARTH 5993 - Supervised Study

Fall.
ARTH6000 Graduate Research Methods in Art History This seminar introduces graduate students to a range of methodologies and approaches to teaching and researching topics in art history and visual studies. Each week, a member of the faculty will present his or her work to the seminar, highlighting unique research approaches, areas of specialty, technological challenges, and professional and pedagogical rewards. Topics include defining a research question; conducting archival research and fieldwork; syllabus design; identifying funding sources; and grant proposal writing. This course is required for all art history Ph.D. students and open to graduate students from other departments. Students are encouraged to use current technologies for presenting their coursework, including the creation of a blog for documenting ongoing research questions related to their teaching and dissertation.

Full details for ARTH 6000 - Graduate Research Methods in Art History

Fall.
ARTH6010 Curatorial Practicum Topic Fall 2022: Commerce, Currencies, and Commodities: Reconfiguring the Archive

Full details for ARTH 6010 - Curatorial Practicum

Fall.
ARTH6101 Proseminar: Introduction to Methods Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art", over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. They will be discussed in the framework of institutions, apparatuses and practices that have shaped the field, identifying how these have contributed to systemic mechanisms of hegemony and exclusion. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing and conceptualizing and doing of art history. 

Full details for ARTH 6101 - Proseminar: Introduction to Methods

Fall.
ARTH6153 Topics in Feminist Media Arts Topic: Feminist Posthumanisms in the Visual Arts.

Full details for ARTH 6153 - Topics in Feminist Media Arts

Fall.
ARTH6545 The Photobook Topic 2022: Tutorial. The history of photography as an art has been mostly on the page, not on the wall.  This course refocuses the standard museum and gallery history of photography back to the book.  Significantly, it takes advantage, through field trips, of the proximity of Cornell to the George Eastman House in Rochester, whose library houses the most important photobooks from around the world, including the best creations from Russia, Japan, and the United States.  Students will learn the basics of photographic printing, book construction, the role of the photobook in the rise of the artist's book in the twentieth century, as well as advanced skills in analysis of the photographic picture and sequencing.  Major themes will include the scientific photobook of the nineteenth century, the documentary photobook of the 1930s, the propaganda photobook of the communist era, the postwar photobooks of Japan, the personal/domestic turn of the 1970s, and the present state of the photobook in the digital era.

Full details for ARTH 6545 - The Photobook

Fall.
ARTH6556 Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of Resistance in the Americas Exploring a genealogy of Latinx, Afro-Latinx, Black, Indigenous, and Chicana/o/x theorizations of modernity and identity, the course asks, what is the decolonial? Is it a space between the colonial and post-colonial? Is it a creative process, an intellectual theorization, or a historical period? Is it a performance, intervention, or embodied experience? Tracing a historical trajectory of the decolonial in poetry, performance, installation, and visual art, the course examines decolonial modes of making and being from the sixteenth to the twenty first century. 

Full details for ARTH 6556 - Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of Resistance in the Americas

Fall.
ARTH6563 Art and Architecture of Colonial Latin America This course surveys the artistic and architectural traditions of Latin America during the period of Spanish colonial rule (ca. 1520s-1820s). It will center primarily on visual cultures of the viceroyalties of New Spain (Mexico) and Peru, but will also cover works of art and architecture from the Caribbean and the northern Andes. The course explores the legacy of pre-Columbian visual traditions in the colonial era as well as the lasting impact of colonial artistic practices in modern and contemporary Latin America. It will also examine colonial Latin America as the crossroads of dynamic artistic and cultural interaction between Indigenous, European, and Afrodescendant groups. Topics to be explored include issues of visual translation and transmission, art and agency, and the creation of new colonial artistic practices and idioms.  

Full details for ARTH 6563 - Art and Architecture of Colonial Latin America

Fall.
ARTH6653 History and Theory of Digital Art In this course, we will examine the role of electronic and digital technologies in the arts of the late 20th and 21st centuries with emphasis on Europe and North America. Beginning with the cybernetically and systems-inspired work of the late sixties, we will explore early uses of computer technology, including early experiments in synthetic video in the 1970s. An overview of pre-internet telematic experiments will lead to an investigation of net art and later currents of digital art. The ongoing development of behavioral art forms will be a central theme. Critical evaluation of various attitudes concerning technology will be encouraged.

Full details for ARTH 6653 - History and Theory of Digital Art

Fall.
ARTH6673 The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration Collaborations among and between Asian and Asian American artists in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have sought to redefine kinship by exploring the politics of belonging, generational dis/connections, and the legacy of the Cold War. Through examining collaborative, multi-media artworks and performances by artists who engage with such questions, this seminar delves into, and expands on, the discourses of transnational and trans-Pacific Asia. With the history of anti-Asian racism and lingering Cold War geopolitics increasingly visible due to Covid-19, students will also critically explore the praxis of reparative kinship, in which settler colonialism and anti-Black racism continue to fracture our work on ecological decolonialization and make alliances against white supremacy fragile. For longer description and instructor bio visit the Society for the Humanities website.

Full details for ARTH 6673 - The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration

Fall.
ARTH6720 Curating the British Empire For description, see STS 4634. 

Full details for ARTH 6720 - Curating the British Empire

Fall.
ARTH6850 The Arts of Southeast Asia The arts of Southeast Asia are studied in their social context, since in traditional societies creative processes are often mapped on the sequence of events that compose human lives. We will be looking particularly at the gendered ways in which bodies are mapped on the land, and how these various framings are often reflected in the unique relationships that emerge between works of art and textual sources. The South Asian epics of the Ramayana (Story of Rama) and the Mahabharata will be explored during the semester as infinitely renewable sources of inspiration.

Full details for ARTH 6850 - The Arts of Southeast Asia

Fall.
VISST1101 Visual Literacy and Design Studio This course is an introductory design studio.  The primary course objective is to introduce principles of visual literacy as it pertains to two-dimensional and three-dimensional issues in design at all scales.  Concepts about representation, expression, composition, color, form, light, structure, and function will be explored through project based learning.  The emphasis will be on learning explicit compositional concepts, visualization skills, and media techniques as well as implicit design sensitivities to serve the student throughout the rest of his or her DEA experience and beyond.

Full details for VISST 1101 - Visual Literacy and Design Studio

Fall.
VISST2174 Introduction to Film Analysis: Meaning and Value Intensive consideration of the ways films generate meaning and of the ways we attribute meaning and value to films. Discussion ranges over commercial narrative, art cinema, documentary, and personal film modes.

Full details for VISST 2174 - Introduction to Film Analysis: Meaning and Value

Fall.
VISST2511 Beginning Dance Composition Weekly assignments in basic elements of choreography. Students compose and present short studies that are discussed and reworked. Problems are defined and explored through class improvisations. Informal showing at end of semester. Includes informal showing of work.

Full details for VISST 2511 - Beginning Dance Composition

Fall.
VISST2744 Gamelan in Indonesian History and Cultures This course combines hands-on instruction in gamelan, Indonesia's most prominent form of traditional music, and the academic study of the broader range of music found in contemporary Indonesia, including Western-oriented and hybrid popular forms. Students thus engage with music directly, and use it as a lens to examine the myriad social and cultural forces that shape it, and that are shaped by it.

Full details for VISST 2744 - Gamelan in Indonesian History and Cultures

Fall.
VISST3175 Global Cinema I Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history. Global Cinema I covers the period from 1895 to 1960. Precise topics will vary from year to year, but may include: early silent cinema; the emergence of Hollywood as industry and a "classical" narrative form; Soviet, German, French and Chinese film cultures; the coming of sound; interwar documentary and avant-garde movements; American cinema in the age of the studio system; Italian Neorealism; the post-war avant-garde.

Full details for VISST 3175 - Global Cinema I

Fall.
VISST3227 Global Dance II This course maintains a critical focus on the role of the moving body in the history of dance offering comparisons in theatre, film and other forms of media and live performance. Moving from the 16th century to present day, particular attention will be directed to the use of abstraction versus narrative and the role of process in the creation of body-centered works. Working both chronologically and conceptually, topics such as utopia, narrative impulse, technology, comparative modernities, political and social theory will enter the discussion. Attendance to live performance, film screenings, music concerts, museum visits and architectural and urban site visits will be required.

Full details for VISST 3227 - Global Dance II

Fall.
VISST3260 Staging Gay and Transgender Histories How have movements for sexual liberation used performance as a means of self-expression and strategies for social justice? How have theatrical stages served as sites of queer sociality and crucibles of invention, where history is made and remade by social actors?

Full details for VISST 3260 - Staging Gay and Transgender Histories

Fall.
VISST3565 Art and Architecture of Colonial Latin America This course surveys the artistic and architectural traditions of Latin America during the period of Spanish colonial rule (ca. 1520s-1820s). It will center primarily on visual cultures of the viceroyalties of New Spain (Mexico) and Peru, but will also cover works of art and architecture from the Caribbean and the northern Andes. The course explores the legacy of pre-Columbian visual traditions in the colonial era as well as the lasting impact of colonial artistic practices in modern and contemporary Latin America. It will also examine colonial Latin America as the crossroads of dynamic artistic and cultural interaction between Indigenous, European, and Afrodescendant groups. Topics to be explored include issues of visual translation and transmission, art and agency, and the creation of new colonial artistic practices and idioms.  

Full details for VISST 3565 - Art and Architecture of Colonial Latin America

Fall.
VISST3650 History and Theory of Digital Art In this course, we will examine the role of electronic and digital technologies in the arts of the late 20th and 21st centuries with emphasis on Europe and North America. Beginning with the cybernetically and systems-inspired work of the late sixties, we will explore early uses of computer technology, including early experiments in synthetic video in the 1970s. An overview of pre-internet telematic experiments will lead to an investigation of net art and later currents of digital art. The ongoing development of behavioral art forms will be a central theme. Critical evaluation of various attitudes concerning technology will be encouraged.

Full details for VISST 3650 - History and Theory of Digital Art

Fall.
VISST3696 The Arts of Southeast Asia The arts of Southeast Asia are studied in their social context, since in traditional societies creative processes are often mapped on the sequence of events that compose human lives. We will be looking particularly at the gendered ways in which bodies are mapped on the land, and how these various framings are often reflected in the unique relationships that emerge between works of art and textual sources. The South Asian epics of the Ramayana (Story of Rama) and the Mahabharata will be explored during the semester as infinitely renewable sources of inspiration.

Full details for VISST 3696 - The Arts of Southeast Asia

Fall.
VISST3707 Race and Sex: Arabian Nights Popular consciousness of The Thousand and One Nights tends to focus on the female protagonist's inexhaustible oratory talents. Less frequently marveled at is the way in which the text's frame story and its one unchanging feature begins with an interdiction on "interracial" sex. What does the representation of this initial sexual encounter in the Arabian Nights have to do with global discourses on race, gender and sexuality? This course explores the millenia-long history of mediations and translations of this ancient Perso-Arabic compilation of myth and fable across literature, film, and popular culture, in Southwest Asia (the Middle East), the U.S. and in Europe. We will pay attention to the historical transmission of tropes about sexuality and blackness as they manifest in various versions of the Arabian Nights. We will situate our discussions within debates in film and media theory, feminist and queer theory, black studies, and psychoanalysis. Students will develop familiarity with various forms of cultural inquiry and theory.

Full details for VISST 3707 - Race and Sex: Arabian Nights

Fall.
VISST3798 Fundamentals of Directing I Focused, practical exercises teach the student fundamental staging techniques that bring written text to theatrical life. A core objective is to increase the student's awareness of why and how certain stage events communicate effectively to an audience. Each student directs a number of exercises as well as a short scene.

Full details for VISST 3798 - Fundamentals of Directing I

Fall.
VISST4101 Proseminar: Introduction to Methods Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art", over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. They will be discussed in the framework of institutions, apparatuses and practices that have shaped the field, identifying how these have contributed to systemic mechanisms of hegemony and exclusion. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing and conceptualizing and doing of art history. 

Full details for VISST 4101 - Proseminar: Introduction to Methods

Fall.
VISST4153 Topics in Feminist Media Arts Topic: Feminist Posthumanisms in the Visual Arts.

Full details for VISST 4153 - Topics in Feminist Media Arts

Fall.
VISST4546 Shakespeare in (Con)text Examines how collaboration among stage directors, designers, and actors leads to differing interpretations of plays. The course focuses on how the texts themselves are blueprints for productions with particular emphasis on the choices available to the actor inherent in the text.

Full details for VISST 4546 - Shakespeare in (Con)text

Fall.
VISST4556 Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of Resistance in the Americas Exploring a genealogy of Latinx, Afro-Latinx, Black, Indigenous, and Chicana/o/x theorizations of modernity and identity, the course asks, what is the decolonial? Is it a space between the colonial and post-colonial? Is it a creative process, an intellectual theorization, or a historical period? Is it a performance, intervention, or embodied experience? Tracing a historical trajectory of the decolonial in poetry, performance, installation, and visual art, the course examines decolonial modes of making and being from the sixteenth to the twenty first century. 

Full details for VISST 4556 - Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of Resistance in the Americas

Fall.
VISST4673 The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration Collaborations among and between Asian and Asian American artists in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have sought to redefine kinship by exploring the politics of belonging, generational dis/connections, and the legacy of the Cold War. Through examining collaborative, multi-media artworks and performances by artists who engage with such questions, this seminar delves into, and expands on, the discourses of transnational and trans-Pacific Asia. With the history of anti-Asian racism and lingering Cold War geopolitics increasingly visible due to Covid-19, students will also critically explore the praxis of reparative kinship, in which settler colonialism and anti-Black racism continue to fracture our work on ecological decolonialization and make alliances against white supremacy fragile. For longer description and instructor bio visit the Society for the Humanities website.

Full details for VISST 4673 - The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration

Fall.
VISST6673 The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration Collaborations among and between Asian and Asian American artists in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have sought to redefine kinship by exploring the politics of belonging, generational dis/connections, and the legacy of the Cold War. Through examining collaborative, multi-media artworks and performances by artists who engage with such questions, this seminar delves into, and expands on, the discourses of transnational and trans-Pacific Asia. With the history of anti-Asian racism and lingering Cold War geopolitics increasingly visible due to Covid-19, students will also critically explore the praxis of reparative kinship, in which settler colonialism and anti-Black racism continue to fracture our work on ecological decolonialization and make alliances against white supremacy fragile. For longer description and instructor bio visit the Society for the Humanities website.

Full details for VISST 6673 - The Kinship of Repair: Asian and Asian American Artists in Collaboration

Fall.
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