Current Courses

Sort by: TitleNumber
Filter by:

View all Summer 2019 courses.

ARTH 1100 : Art Histories: An Introduction
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Cynthia Robinson
This lecture course introduces students to the History of Art as a global and interdisciplinary field. Team-taught by several professors from the department in collaboration with educators and curators from the Herbert Johnson Museum of Art, its aim is to familiarize students with the most significant areas, epochs and works of art as well as with methods to study them. The course will be organized around specific themes central to the history of art. The topic for 2018 is "World Art, Technology, and the Environment." This theme will examine the intersections of art, technology, and the environment from antiquity to the present in various geographical areas and illustrate their interdependence with material examples from the art historical archive. Art works include stone and brick architecture; cement; textiles; stone, bronze and plaster sculpture; oil paintings; prints; photography; film and digital media.
View course details
Description
VISST 1101 : Visual Literacy and Design Studio
Crosslisted as: DEA 1101 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
John Elliott
This course is an introductory design studio.  The primary course objective is to introduce principles of visual literacy as it pertains to two-dimensional and three-dimensional issues in design at all scales.  Concepts about representation, expression, composition, color, form, light, structure, and function will be explored through project based learning.  The emphasis will be on learning explicit compositional concepts, visualization skills, and media techniques as well as implicit design sensitivities to serve the student throughout the rest of his or her DEA experience and beyond.
View course details
Description
VISST 1101 : Visual Literacy and Design Studio
Crosslisted as: DEA 1101 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
John Elliott
This course is an introductory design studio.  The primary course objective is to introduce principles of visual literacy as it pertains to two-dimensional and three-dimensional issues in design at all scales.  Concepts about representation, expression, composition, color, form, light, structure, and function will be explored through project based learning.  The emphasis will be on learning explicit compositional concepts, visualization skills, and media techniques as well as implicit design sensitivities to serve the student throughout the rest of his or her DEA experience and beyond.
View course details
Description
ARTH 1160 : FWS: Dangerous Women
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Hannah Ryan
Upon viewing Carolee Schneemann's Fuses, fellow avant-garde filmmaker Jonas Mekas proclaimed it the film of the year, saying, "It is so gorgeous… so dangerous." While Fuses was censored as pornographic, Schneemann reflects that it's lasting impact as a work of art can be attributed to how it differed from pornography, in visually conveying female pleasure: "There's no objectification or fetishization of the woman." In pushing boundaries of representation, Schneemann and her feminist cohort were considered dangerous, and they are not alone in the history of art. Female artists can be situated among other educated women in their presumptive ability to disrupt the natural (patriarchal) order of things. This course considers: women artists connoted as dangerous, from Frida Kahlo to Kara Walker; how women have been villainized in the visual record, from witches to suffragettes; and the pioneering scholars who uncover and interpret these issues, from Linda Nochlin to Deborah Willis. Ultimately, we will connect danger to power.
View course details
Description
ARTH 1166 : FWS: Latin American Art as Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Maria Fernandez
In this course, students will explore the political roles of art in Latin America in a selection of works ranging from the 7th to the 21st century. How can we conceive of aesthetics as politics in Latin America under a variety of historical regimes, including the Maya, Aztecs, Spanish colonial rule, revolutionary governments, military dictatorships, and the contemporary neo-liberal state? This course also investigates as possible political interventions, visual and performative works traditionally not classified as "political art," including abstract art, performance, theater, installation, new media, and site-specific work.
View course details
Description
ARTH 1167 : FWS: Latin American Modernism
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sara Garzon
Explores how different styles of writing about art such as manifestos, art criticism, catalogue essays, and art history papers have attempted to give resolution to the larger question: what is Latin American art? While most scholars today agree that there is nothing inherently "Latin American" in the art of the region, this was a central concern for many of the artists who will be covered in class: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Joaquin Torres Garcia. Through a discussion on artistic movements between the years of 1920 to 1950, such as Mexican Muralism, Surrealism, Geometric Abstraction, and Neo-Figuration, this course will explore how these different styles of writing about art have themselves helped construct the category "Latin American Art."
View course details
Description
ARTH 1704 : Statues and Public Life
Crosslisted as: CLASS 1704 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Verity Platt
Why do so many societies create statues, and why do they set them up in prominent spaces within their communities? How and why do statues loom so large in the public imagination? Looking both to the cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome and to the modern West, this course examines the social, political, religious, and erotic power attributed to statues across diverse periods and contexts. Drawing on dynamic "Active Learning" methods, we will explore topics including the foundational role of statues for political states (from the Athenian Tyrannicides to the Statue of Liberty), the destruction of statues (from Christian iconoclasm to Confederate monuments), creative "statue-hacks" (from Rome's Pasquino to Wall Street's "Fearless Girl") and objects of cult (from Olympian Zeus to weeping Madonnas). The course will encourage active engagement with statues relevant to students themselves, including the Cornell cast collection, statues on campus, and those in your own home town.
View course details
Description
ARTH 2000 : Introduction to Visual Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 2000, COML 2000, VISST 2000 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
This course introduces the field of Visual Studies.  Visual Studies seeks to define and improve our visual relationship to nature and culture after the modern surge in technology and knowledge.  It contains objects, images, and problems that lie beyond the Art History and experimental science, yet is grown from both cultures.  It teaches the physical and legal limits of human, animal, and machine vision, how knowledge and power get into images, how spectacle drives the economy, and techniques of analysis that can deliver fresh perspectives across disciplines.
View course details
Description
ARTH 2101 : Indigenous Ingenuities as Living Networks
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2100, AMST 2108 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jolene Rickard
This course explores Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) knowledge and its application across the disciplines and through time. In particular, it offers a glimpse into Cornell's local indigenous culture through Haudenosaunee understanding of themselves as a unique people, maintaining traditional teachings and fulfilling ancient responsibilities in the world. Students will engage multiple primary sources including: art, archives, material and expressive culture and interact with Haudenosaunee knowledge holders, intellectuals, and elders.
View course details
Description
VISST 2174 : Introduction to Film Analysis: Meaning and Value
Crosslisted as: PMA 2540 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Veronica Fitzpatrick
Intensive consideration of the ways films generate meaning and of the ways we attribute meaning and value to films. Discussion ranges over commercial narrative, art cinema, documentary, and personal film modes.
View course details
Description
VISST 2193 : Middle Eastern Cinema
Crosslisted as: COML 2293, JWST 2793, NES 2793, PMA 2493 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Deborah Starr
Film industries in the Middle East, as in much of the rest of the world, emerged out of efforts at the national level. In the Arab world and Israel, the film industries reflect upon struggles of self-determination. The Iranian film industry underwent significant changes following the Islamic Revolution of 1979. By viewing a range of films from the Arab world, including North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean, as well as from Turkey, Israel, and Iran, we will consider the significance of these national rubrics and how they have shaped the work of filmmakers throughout the Middle East.   Films also reach beyond the boundaries of the nation, and so, we will consider how these films transcend national borders. On the one hand we will consider limit factors, like censorship, and the role of language and dialect on film viewership and distribution. And, on the other hand, we will consider the influence of external forces, such as the influence of foreign film markets in Europe and North America on filmmakers in the Middle East, as well as the effects of foreign financing—both from Europe and the Gulf States.  All films will be screened with English subtitles.
View course details
Description
ARTH 2221 : Archaeology/Roman Private Life
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2743, CLASS 2743 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Annetta Alexandridis
What was it like to live in the Roman world?  What did that world look, taste and smell like?  How did Romans raise their families, entertain themselves, understand death, and interact with their government? What were Roman values and how did they differ from our own?  This course takes as its subject the everyday lives of individuals and explores those lives using the combined tools of archaeology, architecture and art, as well as some primary source readings.  In doing so, it seeks to integrate those monuments into a world of real people, and to use archaeology to narrate a story about ancient lives and life habits. Some of the topics explored will include the Roman house; the Roman family, children and slaves; bathing and hygiene; food; gardens, agriculture and animals.
View course details
Description
VISST 2511 : Beginning Dance Composition
Crosslisted as: PMA 2300, PMA 3300, PMA 4300, PMA 4301 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
P. Suber
Weekly assignments in basic elements of choreography. Students compose and present short studies that are discussed and reworked. Problems are defined and explored through class improvisations. Informal showing at end of semester. Includes informal showing of work.
View course details
Description
ARTH 2550 : Introduction to Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: LATA 2050, VISST 2550 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
This course is designed to introduce students to Latin American art from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  It will cover the arts of ancient civilizations including the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, Moche, and Inca, as well as the colonial, modern, and contemporary arts of Latin America and the Latino/a diaspora.  Major themes include the relationship between art and religion, innovations and transformations in Latin American art across time, art and identity, as well as Indigenous and Afro-Latin American contributions to the visual arts.  This course examines the societal relevance of images across Latin American cultures by paying close attention to the historical and political contexts in which they were created.  Course readings are drawn from the disciplines of art history, anthropology, and history, along with theoretical perspectives on colonialism, postcolonialism, identity, race, and ethnicity.
View course details
Description
ARTH 2600 : Introduction to Modern Western Art, from the Age of Revolutions to the Age of Capital
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Amy Kim
This course surveys major artistic movements and artists in Europe and the United States from the French Revolution to the rise of Abstract Expressionism in 1950s New York. It introduces students to the study of "modernism" as a broad designation of the defining aesthetic innovations of this period. The course will consider the main currents of modernism with a focus on both formal analysis and historical context: Neoclassicism and Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, the Russian and Soviet avant-garde, Abstraction, Dada and Surrealism, the School of Paris and Abstract Expressionism. Major themes will include the onset of capitalist development within a metropole-colonial world system, the arrival of new scientific and technological discoveries promising transformations of everyday life, the emergence of new forms of individual and collective experience, and the impact of revolutionary political alignments on avant-garde practice and the novel theorizations which addressed it. Finally, the course will consider the formative encounters of various modernisms with a non-European world of art, and offer critical perspectives on the contemporary philosophical responses to this encounter. Considers modern art in a historical and cultural context, from painting associated with the French Revolution through American pop art. The emphasis is on major movements and artists: Neo-Classicism (David), Romanticism (Delacroix), Realism (Courbet), Impressionism (Monet), Post-Impressionism (Van Gogh), Cubism (Picasso), Fauvism (Matisse), Surrealism (Miro), Abstract Expressionism (Pollock), and Pop Art (Warhol). Different critical approaches are examined.
View course details
Description
VISST 2744 : Gamelan in Indonesian History and Cultures
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2245, MUSIC 1341 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christopher Miller
This course combines hands-on instruction in gamelan, Indonesia's most prominent form of traditional music, and the academic study of the broader range of music found in contemporary Indonesia, including Western-oriented and hybrid popular forms. Students thus engage with music directly, and use it as a lens to examine the myriad social and cultural forces that shape it, and that are shaped by it.
View course details
Description
ARTH 2805 : Introduction to Asian Art: Material Worlds
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2285, VISST 2805 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kaja McGowan
An-Yi Pan
Trade in and to Asia proved to be a key force in creating our modern "globalized" world.  The Indian Ocean and the China Seas converged on Southeast Asia, where a cosmopolitan array of ships from every shore plied their trade, set sail, and returned with the monsoon winds.  People, goods, and ideas also traveled on camelback across the undulating contours of the Gobi Desert, connecting India, the Near East and Central Asia with China, Korea, and Japan. This course introduces students to the raw ingredients of things in motion, poised interactively in time and space, as material worlds collide. Wood, bamboo, bronze, clay, earthenware, ink, spices, textiles and tea - students will navigate sites of encounter at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum from pre modern to the present.
View course details
Description
ARTH 3001 : Documentary Art
Crosslisted as: VISST 3001 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
Description
ARTH 3010 : Photography and the American Dream
Crosslisted as: AMST 3010, ART 3810, VISST 3010 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Bill Gaskins
Who are 'the poor' in the United States? Who are the largest recipients of federal welfare and entitlement spending? Why is there an unprecedented simultaneous increase in wealth and poverty in the United States at this point in its history? What role does photography play in our understanding and misunderstanding of poverty in 'the greatest country in the world?' In this course we will explore the perceptions of poverty in the United States through three major American newspapers.
View course details
Description
VISST 3115 : Video and New Media: Art, Theory, Politics
Crosslisted as: COML 3115, ENGL 3115, PMA 3515, ROMS 3115 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Timothy Murray
The course will offer an overview of video art, alternative documentary video, and digital installation and networked art. It will analyze four phases of video and new media: (1) the development of video from its earliest turn away from television; (2) video's relation to art and installation; (3) video's migration into digital art; (4) the relation of video and new media to visual theory and social movements. Screenings will include early political and feminist video (Ant Farm, Rosler, Paper Tiger TV, Jones), conceptual video of the '80s and '90s (Vasulka, Lucier, Viola, Hill), gay and multicultural video of the '90s (Muntadas, Riggs, Piper, Fung, Parmar), networked and activist new media of the 21st century (Critical Art Ensemble, Electronic Disturbance Theater, SubRosa, Preemptive Media). Secondary theoretical readings on postmodernism, video theory, multicultural theory, and digital culture will provide students with a cultural and political context for the discussion of video and new media style, dissemination, and reception.
View course details
Description
VISST 3175 : Global Cinema I
Crosslisted as: COML 3261, PMA 3550, PMA 6550 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Veronica Fitzpatrick
Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history. Global Cinema I covers the period from 1895 to 1960. Precise topics will vary from year to year, but may include: early silent cinema; the emergence of Hollywood as industry and a "classical" narrative form; Soviet, German, French and Chinese film cultures; the coming of sound; interwar documentary and avant-garde movements; American cinema in the age of the studio system; Italian Neorealism; the post-war avant-garde.
View course details
Description
VISST 3176 : Global Cinema II
Crosslisted as: PMA 3551, PMA 6551 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Samantha Sheppard
Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history.
View course details
Description
VISST 3227 : Global Dance II
Crosslisted as: PMA 3227 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
P. Suber
This course maintains a critical focus on the role of the moving body in the history of dance offering comparisons in theatre, film and other forms of media and live performance. Moving from the 16th century to present day, particular attention will be directed to the use of abstraction versus narrative and the role of process in the creation of body-centered works. Working both chronologically and conceptually, topics such as utopia, narrative impulse, technology, comparative modernities, political and social theory will enter the discussion. Attendance to live performance, film screenings, music concerts, museum visits and architectural and urban site visits will be required.
View course details
Description
ARTH 3250 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carol Griggs
Brita Lorentzen
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
View course details
Description
VISST 3342 : Human Perception: Application to Computer Graphics, Art, and Visual Display
Crosslisted as: COGST 3420, PSYCH 3420, PSYCH 6420 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
David Field
Our present technology allows us to transmit and display information through a variety of media. To make the most of these media channels, it is important to consider the limitations and abilities of the human observer. The course considers a number of applied aspects of human perception with an emphasis on the display of visual information. Topics include "three-dimensional" display systems, color theory, spatial and temporal limitations of the visual systems, attempts at subliminal communication, and "visual" effects in film and television.
View course details
Description
ARTH 3440 : Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael, and their World
Crosslisted as: VISST 3443 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Claudia Lazzaro
Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael transformed the art of their time. Leonardo was an extraordinary thinker, scientist, and engineer as well as artist. Michelangelo invented grandiose projects for ambitious patrons and created a novel visual language with parallels to his poetry, and in his later years, profoundly spiritual images. Raphael, the consummate court artist, antiquarian, and archaeologist, produced a new classical style. Leonardo and Michelangelo pioneered new approaches to the study and representation of the human body. They deployed wit and humor and reinvented the grotesque from ancient art, and all influenced the proliferation of erotic art. Biographies presented them as geniuses, leading the Florentine sculptor Cellini to model himself in his autobiography on a larger-than-life Michelangelo. Florentine painters and sculptors grappled with Michelangelo's enormous inventiveness. We will also examine prints in the Johnson Museum after Michelangelo and Raphael, and consider recent attributions of new discoveries to them.
View course details
Description
ARTH 3506 : Slavery and Visual Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3506, ASRC 3506, COML 3681, VISST 3506 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cheryl Finley
This interdisciplinary undergraduate lecture examines the visual culture of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade from the 16th century to the present. Lectures present artifacts, prints, paintings, photographs, sculpture, film and installation art that images the history of slavery and its profound contemporary resonance. Lectures and assignments consider the following themes: how does the gaze structure vision and influence the control of historical narratives? Which themes dominate the visual culture of slavery? How does visual culture encode memory, violence or racism? How did the visual culture of slavery produce and circulate new technologies of vison? Where is the history of slavery visible in the built environment or the local landscape? Students study artifacts in the May Anti-Slavery Collection at Kroch Library and artworks at the Johnson Museum. Field trip to nearby anti-slavery sites of memory.
View course details
Description
ARTH 3535 : New German Cinema
Crosslisted as: GERST 3525, PMA 3525, VISST 3535 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Erik Born
This course introduces the New German Cinema (1962-85), an influential movement of West German filmmakers including Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Alexander Kluge, Margarethe von Trotta, and Wim Wenders. Like the French New Wave, the New German Cinema is known not only for grappling with the nation's complex history, but also for experimenting with early multimedia forms. Watching the movement's celebrated films and reading its controversial texts, we will discuss the complex search for national identity after World War II; problems of authorship, genre, and cinematic traditions; and the changing conceptions of media and the public sphere. Students without experience in film studies are welcome—the course will also double as an introduction to discussing and analyzing film. Screenings in German with English subtitles.
View course details
Description
VISST 3560 : Computing Cultures
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3061, COMM 3560, INFO 3561, STS 3561 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Malte Ziewitz
Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.
View course details
Description
VISST 3581 : Imagining Migration in Film and Literature
Crosslisted as: AMST 3581, COML 3580, GERST 3581, PMA 3481 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Leslie Adelson
Sabine Haenni
What role should imaginative arts play in debates about transnational migration, one of the principal factors re-shaping community and communication today?  Focusing on literature and film from the late 20th and early 21st centuries, with primary examples drawn from Germany, France and the United States—in relation to Turkey, Hungary, Tunisia, Iran, Nigeria, China, Mexico, and Japan—this course explores how creative arts rework the fabric of social life affected by migration.  Seminar-style discussion of assigned readings and viewings, with occasional lectures on other arts and regions.  Thematic units organized around key concepts such as borders and movement, ethnoscapes and citizenship, reading and viewing, labor and leisure, cityscapes and place-making, mediascapes and personhood, lawfulness and illegality, language and speech, art and perception.   
View course details
Description
VISST 3620 : Lighting Design Studio I
Crosslisted as: PMA 3620 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
The theory and practice of lighting design as a medium for artistic expression. This course explores the aesthetic and mechanical aspects of light and their application in a variety of disciplines. Emphasis is on understanding lighting's function in an environment and manipulating light effectively. Artistic style and viewpoint are also covered.
View course details
Description
VISST 3798 : Fundamentals of Directing I
Crosslisted as: PMA 3880 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
David Feldshuh
Focused, practical exercises teach the student fundamental staging techniques that bring written text to theatrical life. A core objective is to increase the student's awareness of why and how certain stage events communicate effectively to an audience. Each student directs a number of exercises as well as a short scene.
View course details
Description
ARTH 3830 : Bollywood and Beyond: South Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6830, ASIAN 3339, ASIAN 6669, VISST 3830 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Iftikhar Dadi
Description
ARTH 3850 : The Arts of Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3350, VISST 3696 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kaja McGowan
The arts of Southeast Asia are studied in their social context, since in traditional societies creative processes are often mapped on the sequence of events that compose human lives. We will be looking particularly at the gendered ways in which bodies are mapped on the land, and how these various framings are often reflected in the unique relationships that emerge between works of art and textual sources.
View course details
Description
ARTH 3856 : Performing Angkor: Dance, Silk and Stone
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3356 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kaja McGowan
Description
ARTH 4015 : Photography and the Archive
Crosslisted as: AMST 6015, ARTH 6015 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cheryl Finley
Description
ARTH 4040 : The Photobook
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6940 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
Description
ARTH 4101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6101, VISST 4101 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Anderson
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4165 : Visual Encounters in the Early Modern World
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6165, LATA 4165, LATA 6165, VISST 4165 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Claudia Lazzaro
This course will look at visual representations of cross-cultural encounters throughout the early modern period with a special emphasis on exchanges between Europe and the Americas (15th-18th centuries). The visual encounters are considered within the context of an increasingly interconnected global system. This course will be organized around a set of case studies that explore a diverse array of artworks, including prints, manuscripts, cartographic illustrations, portraits, and the decorative arts. Topics to be covered include European images of Amerindian peoples and lands, botanical illustrations, the impact of European prints on Latin American art, and collections of New World artifacts in European cabinets of curiosity. This course will explore issues of visual translation and dissemination in the creation of New World artistic traditions. In turn, it also examines the reception of New World objects by European patrons. Readings will be drawn from the disciplines of art history, the history of science, and literary theory, linked by a common framework of visuality and cross-cultural exchange.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4171 : 19th Century Art and Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Eric Denker
An examination and analysis of the major trends in art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Post Impressionism and the dawn of the twentieth century. Lectures and readings will concentrate on the historical context of great masterpieces by seminal artists. The class will investigate the imagery and theoretical foundation of nineteenth-century European and American art using a selection of appropriate methodological approaches. Major figures to be discussed include David, Copley, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Cole, Manet, Morisot, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Rodin, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Part of each class will be devoted to discussions of the readings. Two classes will be held in the National Gallery of Art at times and dates to be determined. Exams, a term paper, and class participation will be used for evaluative purposes.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4171 : 19th Century Art and Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Eric Denker
An examination and analysis of the major trends in art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Post Impressionism and the dawn of the twentieth century. Lectures and readings will concentrate on the historical context of great masterpieces by seminal artists. The class will investigate the imagery and theoretical foundation of nineteenth-century European and American art using a selection of appropriate methodological approaches. Major figures to be discussed include David, Copley, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Cole, Manet, Morisot, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Rodin, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Part of each class will be devoted to discussions of the readings. Two classes will be held in the National Gallery of Art at times and dates to be determined. Exams, a term paper, and class participation will be used for evaluative purposes.
View course details
Description
VISST 4260 : Adaptation: Text/Theatricality
Crosslisted as: PMA 4660 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Beth Milles
Mounting a script into a show is a process of adaptation from page to stage. This course challenges the boundaries of text to discover the possibilities of performance. Asks: How do we translate inspiration into tangible (or intangible) theatrical imagery? Working in workshop format as actors and writers, students explore the process of developing theatre pieces based on a variety of sources. 
View course details
Description
ARTH 4354 : Byzantine Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4354, ARKEO 6354, ARTH 6354, CLASS 6754, NES 4354, NES 6354 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Anderson
A seminar on the archaeology of the Byzantine Empire, from the late Roman through to the early modern periods. Topics to be covered include: long-term changes in settlement patterns and urban development; the material traces of state and monastic control over productive landscapes; the idea of the border and the nature of its defense; and the fraught relationship between "Byzantine" and "classical" archaeologies.
View course details
Description
VISST 4436 : Topics in Indian Film
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4436, PMA 4536 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gold
The course will treat various aspects of Indian film, with focal topics to vary from year to year.  These topics will include religion in Indian film, Indian art films, and the golden age of Indian film.  All topics will be discussed in relation to the conventions of mainstream Bollywood cinema and their social and cultural significance.  Each week a film must be viewed to prepare for class discussion; screenings will be arranged as appropriate. No knowledge of an Indian language is needed.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4540 : Film History for Art Historians
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6540 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
This seminar will offer a survey of film theory and history tailored for art historians, especially but not exclusively for modernists.  The influence of cinema on twentieth-century aesthetics cannot be overstated, yet art historians routinely work without enough knowledge about the history of cinema or the grammar and rhetoric of its techniques.  The history of montage, continuity editing, cinematography, and narrative form will be covered as we encounter major works from world cinema in dialogue with significant movements in modern art.  German Expressionism, Surrealism, Italian Neorealism, Film Noir, Hollywood Auteurism will be among the major movements covered, as will the entry into the fine art world of moving image media.
View course details
Description
VISST 4563 : Lighting Design Studio II
Crosslisted as: PMA 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Edward Intemann
Concentrates on designing lighting for different genres of performance in various venues. Emphasis is placed on developing both the visual sophistication and the technical artistry of the lighting designer. Commitment, personal style, and professional presentation are stressed.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4590 : Theory and History of Abstraction
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6590 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Amy Kim
In this course, we will explore the long and varied history of abstraction as both a practice and an ideal. We will survey this history by drawing on two distinct bodies of thought relevant to the problem of abstraction, forming a parallel discourse across the length of the course. The theoretical framing will begin by considering Aristotle on aphareisis before proceeding to consider various writings by Marx, Simmel, Husserl, Heidegger and Derrida. The specifically art historical material will begin by addressing the origins of perspectival space before considering practices of abstraction in nineteenth and twentieth century art. We will conclude by examining postwar global variants of abstraction for insights into the history of modernism.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6601, FGSS 4601, FGSS 6601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lisa Pincus
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4691 : Art and Globalization
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6691, VISST 4691 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Iftikhar Dadi
While globalization is a process unfolding over many centuries, it has arguably intensified in recent decades. The incorporation of the communist world and independent nation-states into global finance and transnational capitalism from the 1970s onwards has resulted in temporal acceleration and spatial compression on a planetary scale. In the world of art, this has resulted in multifaceted developments. The rise of a spectacular global installation art in biennials and art fairs is also accompanied with myriad local practices that engage with society and politics. This seminar will examine contemporary art in multiple historical and methodological frameworks. Topics covered will include the relation between art and institutions, new patronage structures, neoliberal subjectivities, new materialisms, informal life worlds, digital and social medias, violence, migration, and ecological destruction.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4720 : Curating the British Empire
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6720, BSOC 4634, HIST 4634, HIST 6634, SHUM 4634, SHUM 6634, STS 4634, STS 6634 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jessica Ratcliff
During Europe's colonial era, the modern museum emerged as a site of cultural and scientific authority. This course investigates the history of imperial collections and collectors, with a focus on Britain and the East India Company in the nineteenth century. Examples of topics include: the "supply chain" for artifacts and knowledge resources; changing conceptions of intellectual property, ownership and access; household versus public versus for-profit collections; museums and the narration of social values and cultural identities; debates over the function or aims of museums and related institutions; the collections and the administration of the empire; the collections and the growth of the sciences; the postcolonial legacies of colonial collections.
View course details
Description
VISST 4793 : Advanced Film and Video Projects
Crosslisted as: PMA 4585 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
A continuation of PMA 3570, Introduction to Visual Storytelling, students will dive deeper into creating story driven short form narratives. Students will have the opportunity to develop and produce a short film over the course of the semester.  The expectation is the follow through of the filmmaking process, from story development, preproduction, production, post production and distribution. Students are expected to collaborate heavily and crew on each other's film productions, in various roles. Final film projects will be screened in a public, open-campus event at the end of the semester.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4820 : Art in Zen and Zen in Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6820, ASIAN 4450, ASIAN 6650 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
An-Yi Pan
This course explores how the art of Zen (Chan) developed in China and was transmitted to Korea and Japan. It will also examine how ideas of Zen informed Western Modern art in both Europe and North America, and how these artistic ideas in turn influenced postwar abstract art in many parts of the world.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4852 : Shadowplay: Asian Art and Performance
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6852, ASIAN 4442, ASIAN 6646, VISST 4852 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kaja McGowan
Shadowplay is a superb medium for storytelling. As with many performing arts in Asia, neither the highly stylized images of puppets, nor its musical, or linguistic complexity detract from its wide popularity. Why does an art that appears so obscure exercise such broad appeal? This seminar explores the playful and politically adept fluctuations of shadows across screens from India to Mainland and Island Southeast Asia. We will also briefly examine East Asian developments, particularly in China and Japan. In each of the countries where shadow theatre exists it has acquired its own repertory and a distinct technique and style of its own. This aesthetic has translated locally into paint, sculpture, architecture, cinema, and modern and contemporary installation art.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4855 : Threads of Consequence: Textiles in South and Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6855, ASIAN 4487, ASIAN 6644, VISST 4855, VISST 6855 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kaja McGowan
This seminar explores how patterned cloths serve as a symbolic medium, functioning on multiple levels of understanding and communication. As spun, dyed, and woven threads of consequence, textiles can be seen to enter into all phases of social, economic, political, religious, and performance processes, often assuming unusual properties and attributes. As bearers of talismanic messages, signifiers of rank, and as the recipients of influences from maritime trade and touristic demand, textiles are read between the folds of complex exchange mechanisms in South and Southeast Asia.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4991 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
An-Yi Pan
Kaja McGowan
Andrew Moisey
Iftikhar Dadi
Jolene Rickard
Cynthia Robinson
Salah Hassan
Annetta Alexandridis
Maria Fernandez
Claudia Lazzaro
Lisa Pincus
Benjamin Anderson
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Verity Platt
Charles Johnson
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4992 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Annetta Alexandridis
Iftikhar Dadi
Maria Fernandez
Cheryl Finley
Salah Hassan
Claudia Lazzaro
Kaja McGowan
Jolene Rickard
An-Yi Pan
Cynthia Robinson
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Benjamin Anderson
Lisa Pincus
Andrew Moisey
Charles Johnson
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4998 : Honors Work I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Annetta Alexandridis
Iftikhar Dadi
A course for senior Art History majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the History of Art faculty.
View course details
Description
ARTH 4999 : Honors Work II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
Maria Fernandez
The student under faculty direction prepares a senior thesis.
View course details
Description
ARTH 5991 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jolene Rickard
Iftikhar Dadi
Annetta Alexandridis
Cynthia Robinson
Andrew Moisey
An-Yi Pan
Claudia Lazzaro
Salah Hassan
Kaja McGowan
Maria Fernandez
Lisa Pincus
Benjamin Anderson
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Verity Platt
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
View course details
Description
ARTH 5992 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Annetta Alexandridis
Iftikhar Dadi
Maria Fernandez
Cheryl Finley
Salah Hassan
Claudia Lazzaro
Kaja McGowan
Jolene Rickard
An-Yi Pan
Cynthia Robinson
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Benjamin Anderson
Lisa Pincus
Andrew Moisey
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
View course details
Description
ARTH 5993 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
An-Yi Pan
Iftikhar Dadi
Andrew Moisey
Claudia Lazzaro
Kaja McGowan
Jolene Rickard
Cynthia Robinson
Salah Hassan
Annetta Alexandridis
Maria Fernandez
Benjamin Anderson
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Charles Johnson
Lisa Pincus
Verity Platt
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
View course details
Description
ARTH 5994 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Annetta Alexandridis
Iftikhar Dadi
Maria Fernandez
Cheryl Finley
Salah Hassan
Claudia Lazzaro
Kaja McGowan
Jolene Rickard
An-Yi Pan
Cynthia Robinson
Lisa Pincus
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Benjamin Anderson
Andrew Moisey
Charles Johnson
Shirley Samuels
Astrid Van Oyen
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6000 : Graduate Research Methods in Art History
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Iftikhar Dadi
This seminar introduces graduate students to a range of methodologies and approaches to teaching and researching topics in art history and visual studies. Each week, a member of the faculty will present his or her work to the seminar, highlighting unique research approaches, areas of specialty, technological challenges, and professional and pedagogical rewards. Topics include defining a research question; conducting archival research and fieldwork; syllabus design; identifying funding sources; and grant proposal writing. This course is required for all art history Ph.D. students and open to graduate students from other departments. Students are encouraged to use current technologies for presenting their coursework, including the creation of a blog for documenting ongoing research questions related to their teaching and dissertation.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6015 : Photography and the Archive
Crosslisted as: AMST 6015, ARTH 4015 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cheryl Finley
This graduate seminar explores the making of photographic archives, the narratives they tell, and the parameters that define them as objects of study. As visual collections, photographic archives present specific concerns - especially as digital technologies change the way knowledge is classified, stored, retrieved and disseminated. To be sure, differential power relations determine what is collected - what is remembered or forgotten - by societies and institutions. Social and economic histories as well as experiences of race, class, gender and sexuality affect the construction, acquisition and maintenance of archives and their ability to influence knowledge production. Students in this course study archival practices by choosing a unique photographic archive at Cornell for a research project, which may be realized as an exhibition (online or otherwise), a documentary film, or a digital humanities project.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6060 : Visual Ideology
Crosslisted as: COML 6600, GERST 6600 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Geoffrey Waite
Some of the most powerful approaches to visual practices have come from outside or from the peripheries of the institution of art history and criticism. This seminar will analyze the interactions between academically sanctioned disciplines (such as iconography and connoisseurship) and innovations coming from philosophy, psychoanalysis, historiography, sociology, literary theory, mass media criticism, feminism, and Marxism. We will try especially to develop: (1) a general theory of "visual ideology" (the gender, social, racial, and class determinations on the production, consumption, and appropriation of visual artifacts under modern and postmodern conditions); and (2) contemporary theoretical practices that articulate these determinations. Examples will be drawn from the history of oil painting, architecture, city planning, photography, film, and other mass media.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4101, VISST 4101 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Anderson
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6165 : Visual Encounters in the Early Modern World
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4165, LATA 4165, LATA 6165, VISST 4165 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ananda Cohen-Aponte
Claudia Lazzaro
This course will look at visual representations of cross-cultural encounters throughout the early modern period with a special emphasis on exchanges between Europe and the Americas (15th-18th centuries). The visual encounters are considered within the context of an increasingly interconnected global system. This course will be organized around a set of case studies that explore a diverse array of artworks, including prints, manuscripts, cartographic illustrations, portraits, and the decorative arts. Topics to be covered include European images of Amerindian peoples and lands, botanical illustrations, the impact of European prints on Latin American art, and collections of New World artifacts in European cabinets of curiosity. This course will explore issues of visual translation and dissemination in the creation of New World artistic traditions. In turn, it also examines the reception of New World objects by European patrons. Readings will be drawn from the disciplines of art history, the history of science, and literary theory, linked by a common framework of visuality and cross-cultural exchange.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6354 : Byzantine Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4354, ARKEO 6354, ARTH 4354, CLASS 6754, NES 4354, NES 6354 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Anderson
A seminar on the archaeology of the Byzantine Empire, from the late Roman through to the early modern periods. Topics to be covered include: long-term changes in settlement patterns and urban development; the material traces of state and monastic control over productive landscapes; the idea of the border and the nature of its defense; and the fraught relationship between "Byzantine" and "classical" archaeologies.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6540 : Film History for Art Historians
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4540 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
This seminar will offer a survey of film theory and history tailored for art historians, especially but not exclusively for modernists.  The influence of cinema on twentieth-century aesthetics cannot be overstated, yet art historians routinely work without enough knowledge about the history of cinema or the grammar and rhetoric of its techniques.  The history of montage, continuity editing, cinematography, and narrative form will be covered as we encounter major works from world cinema in dialogue with significant movements in modern art.  German Expressionism, Surrealism, Italian Neorealism, Film Noir, Hollywood Auteurism will be among the major movements covered, as will the entry into the fine art world of moving image media.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6590 : Theory and History of Abstraction
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4590 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Amy Kim
In this course, we will explore the long and varied history of abstraction as both a practice and an ideal. We will survey this history by drawing on two distinct bodies of thought relevant to the problem of abstraction, forming a parallel discourse across the length of the course. The theoretical framing will begin by considering Aristotle on aphareisis before proceeding to consider various writings by Marx, Simmel, Husserl, Heidegger and Derrida. The specifically art historical material will begin by addressing the origins of perspectival space before considering practices of abstraction in nineteenth and twentieth century art. We will conclude by examining postwar global variants of abstraction for insights into the history of modernism.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4601, FGSS 4601, FGSS 6601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lisa Pincus
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6691 : Art and Globalization
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4691, VISST 4691 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Iftikhar Dadi
While globalization is a process unfolding over many centuries, it has arguably intensified in recent decades. The incorporation of the communist world and independent nation-states into global finance and transnational capitalism from the 1970s onwards has resulted in temporal acceleration and spatial compression on a planetary scale. In the world of art, this has resulted in multifaceted developments. The rise of a spectacular global installation art in biennials and art fairs is also accompanied with myriad local practices that engage with society and politics. This seminar will examine contemporary art in multiple historical and methodological frameworks. Topics covered will include the relation between art and institutions, new patronage structures, neoliberal subjectivities, new materialisms, informal life worlds, digital and social medias, violence, migration, and ecological destruction.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6714 : Traveling Seminar in Roman Painting
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7714 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Verity Platt
Some of our very best evidence for Roman art survives in the form of frescoes in Rome, Ostia and the Bay of Naples. Exploring imperial palaces, rural villas, town houses, shops, baths, tombs, taverns and gardens, we will examine the visual dynamics and socio-cultural significance of wall-paintings within their original archaeological contexts. The study of frescoes offers an exciting means of tackling important questions relating to Roman social history alongside the complexities of representation within the Greco-Roman visual tradition, including the relationship between art and nature, the use of myth, the spatial dynamics of interior decorative schemes, visual-verbal relations, and concepts of ornament, medium, and abstraction. This course will be taught as a Traveling Seminar, which will include a trip to Rome and Bay of Naples over spring break. Spaces are limited.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6720 : Curating the British Empire
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4720, BSOC 4634, HIST 4634, HIST 6634, SHUM 4634, SHUM 6634, STS 4634, STS 6634 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jessica Ratcliff
During Europe's colonial era, the modern museum emerged as a site of cultural and scientific authority. This course investigates the history of imperial collections and collectors, with a focus on Britain and the East India Company in the nineteenth century. Examples of topics include: the "supply chain" for artifacts and knowledge resources; changing conceptions of intellectual property, ownership and access; household versus public versus for-profit collections; museums and the narration of social values and cultural identities; debates over the function or aims of museums and related institutions; the collections and the administration of the empire; the collections and the growth of the sciences; the postcolonial legacies of colonial collections.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6736 : Aesthetics of the Sacred in Classical Antiquity
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7736, CLASS 6746, RELST 6746 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Verity Platt
Description
ARTH 6820 : Art in Zen and Zen in Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4820, ASIAN 4450, ASIAN 6650 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
An-Yi Pan
This course explores how the art of Zen (Chan) developed in China and was transmitted to Korea and Japan. It will also examine how ideas of Zen informed Western Modern art in both Europe and North America, and how these artistic ideas in turn influenced postwar abstract art in many parts of the world.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6830 : Bollywood and Beyond: South Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3830, ASIAN 3339, ASIAN 6669, VISST 3830 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Iftikhar Dadi
Description
ARTH 6852 : Shadowplay: Asian Art and Performance
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4852, ASIAN 4442, ASIAN 6646, VISST 4852 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kaja McGowan
Shadowplay is a superb medium for storytelling. As with many performing arts in Asia, neither the highly stylized images of puppets, nor its musical, or linguistic complexity detract from its wide popularity. Why does an art that appears so obscure exercise such broad appeal? This seminar explores the playful and politically adept fluctuations of shadows across screens from India to Mainland and Island Southeast Asia. We will also briefly examine East Asian developments, particularly in China and Japan. In each of the countries where shadow theatre exists it has acquired its own repertory and a distinct technique and style of its own. This aesthetic has translated locally into paint, sculpture, architecture, cinema, and modern and contemporary installation art.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6855 : Threads of Consequence: Textiles in South and Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4855, ASIAN 4487, ASIAN 6644, VISST 4855, VISST 6855 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kaja McGowan
This seminar explores how patterned cloths serve as a symbolic medium, functioning on multiple levels of understanding and communication. As spun, dyed, and woven threads of consequence, textiles can be seen to enter into all phases of social, economic, political, religious, and performance processes, often assuming unusual properties and attributes. As bearers of talismanic messages, signifiers of rank, and as the recipients of influences from maritime trade and touristic demand, textiles are read between the folds of complex exchange mechanisms in South and Southeast Asia.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6940 : The Photobook
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4040 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
The history of photography as an art has been mostly on the page, not on the wall.  This course refocuses the standard museum and gallery history of photography back to the book.  Significantly, it takes advantage, through field trips, of the proximity of Cornell to the George Eastman House in Rochester, whose library houses the most important photobooks from around the world, including the best creations from Russia, Japan, and the United States.  Students will learn the basics of photographic printing, book construction, the role of the photobook in the rise of the artist's book in the twentieth century, as well as advanced skills in analysis of the photographic picture and sequencing.  Major themes will include the scientific photobook of the nineteenth century, the documentary photobook of the 1930s, the propaganda photobook of the communist era, the postwar photobooks of Japan, the personal/domestic turn of the 1970s, and the present state of the photobook in the digital era.
View course details
Description