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ARTH 1100 : Art Histories: An Introduction
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This lecture class introduces students to the History of Art as a global and interdisciplinary field. Team-taught by several professors from the department its aim is to familiarize students with the most significant areas, epochs and works of art as well as with methods to study them. The course will be organized around specific themes central to the history of art. The theme for fall 2017 is "World Art and Technology." This theme will examine the intersections of art and technology from antiquity to the present in various geographical areas and illustrate their interdependence with material examples from the art historical archive. Art works include stone and brick architecture; cement; textiles; stone, bronze and plaster sculpture; oil paintings; prints; photography; film and digital art.
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ARTH 1161 : FWS: Seeing in Miniature: Indian Painting
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course explores miniature painting styles in India, from landscape to erotica, spanning the Deccan sultanate to the British Empire from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. We will explore a variety of methods and perspectives for studying Indian painting such as formal visual and textual analysis as well as the politics of museum displays. In addition to looking at miniature paintings, students will creatively and critically analyze film (The Chessplayers) as well as primary (ni'matnama) and secondary source materials. Particular attention will be paid to the historical conditions that constrain the study of Indian painting and construct the academic disciplines of South Asian and Islamic art history. The final writing assignment will be a research paper on one of the paintings viewed in class.
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ARTH 2200 : Introduction to Art History: The Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2700, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
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ARTH 2400 : Introduction to Art History: Renaissance and Baroque Art
Crosslisted as: VISST 2645 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A survey of European art from 1400-1750, including all arts but emphasizing painting and analysis of the works of such major artists as Jan van Eyck, Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Velazquez, Rembrandt, and Vermeer.  We will view artworks through their social, religious, and political contexts, the role of patrons in the creative process, and the response of viewers.  Major issues include the function of art in religious devotion, moral, philosophical, and social concerns reflected in visual images, changing notions of both the artist and the individual in society, the roles of male and female, and the theme of love.
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ARTH 2500 : Introduction to the History of Photography
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Provides a lecture survey of the history of photography over a course of two centuries. Starting with its invention in the 1830s, covers the subject topically and chronologically. During the nineteenth century, focus is on technical developments and on the complex relations that situate photography in relation to painting, portraiture, urban life, war, anthropology and ethnology, exploration and travel, and science and industry. Over the course of the twentieth century, photography is enriched by new developments: its use as a modernist and experimental art form, in social documentary and photojournalism, in propaganda, in advertising and fashion. In recent decades, photography has assumed a centrality in the practice of conceptual postmodern art, and is currently undergoing a major transformation in the age of digital media.
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ARTH 2711 : Archaeology of the Roman world: Italy and the West
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2711, CLASS 2711 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Roman period has given us a density of archaeological remains that remains unsurpassed in world history, and these have been studied since the very birth of archaeology. As a result, Roman archaeology allows us to explore questions that historians and archaeologists of other periods often cannot. Within this rich body of archaeological evidence, this course will focus on key themes and material for the Roman period in Italy and the Western provinces (especially Gaul and Britain). Central topics include imperialism, urbanism, economy, and social life. What was the archaeological imprint of conquest? How did goods travel around such a wide geographical expanse? What images did people in Britain have of the emperor? We will investigate particular types of evidence, from public monuments over ceramic amphorae to the road system. And we will explore methodological issues, such as what archaeological evidence can tell us, or how to introduce protagonists other than emperors and armies in our reconstructions of the Roman world. Throughout the course, we will question whether the modern world is a productive and valid parallel for archaeological study of the Roman world.
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ARTH 3101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6101, VISST 3101 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
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ARTH 3250 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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ARTH 3419 : Rembrandt's Circle: Global Dutch - Travel and Trade in Africa, the Americas, Asia
Crosslisted as: VISST 3419 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The variety of visual experience in 17th-century Dutch art is legion: still life, portraiture and self-portraiture, landscape and cityscape, architectural painting and scenes of everyday life, all in paint and print. New scientific technologies and trade routes, a proto-capitalist economy and highly networked society also place their mark on the cultural and artistic production in the Netherlands. This semester we will investigate the extraordinary global reach of the Dutch to both east and west, resulting in trade and luxury goods, new knowledge of peoples, flora, and fauna—considered marvelous—as well as encounters with and portrayals of difference. As they leave their marks on the visual, we will explore Africa and the African slave trade; East Asia, specifically Taiwan and Japan; South America, notably Brazil; New Amsterdam; Jakarta and Indonesia. Where available, we will address how indigenous peoples portrayed the Dutch. The course will involve meetings at the Johnson Museum.
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ARTH 3510 : African Art and Culture
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3501 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is a survey of the visual art and material cultural traditions of sub-Saharan Africa. It aims at investigating the different forms of visual artistic traditions in relation to their historical and socio-cultural context. The symbolism and complexity of traditional African art will be explored through the analysis of myth, ritual and cosmology. In-depth analysis of particular African societies will be used to examine the relationship of the arts to indigenous concepts of time, space, color, form and socio-political order. New and contemporary art forms associated with major socio-economic changes and processes of assimilation and acculturation will also be explored. These include tourist art, popular art, and elite art.
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ARTH 3820 : Introduction to the Arts of Japan
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3381 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
As an island nation east of the Asian continent, Japan developed a unique culture that reflects both continental and indigenous characteristics. This course examines pre- and post-contact with continental culture and the process of artistic acculturation and assimilation in successive periods of Japanese art history.
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ARTH 3901 : Ancient Art in Upstate New York
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6901 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This tutorial investigates ancient art in collections (private and museums) in Upstate New York. Students learn to properly describe, document (in word and image), identify and finally present or publish the individual objects in an online exhibition and catalogue. (Theme for fall 2017: Roman sculpture at Sonnenberg Gardens, NY).
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ARTH 4153 : Topics in Feminist Media Arts
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6153, FGSS 4153, FGSS 6153, VISST 4153 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Topic for fall 2017: Feminist Posthumanisms in the Visual Arts.
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ARTH 4440 : Constructing the Self in the Sixteenth Century
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6440, VISST 4440 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines issues of identity and self-fashioning in the 16th century in early modern Europe, especially Italy.  The proliferation of courtesy manuals, most famous of them by Castiglione, instructed in "civility," and reflected the concern with manners, appearance, and the ideal characteristics of grace and sprezzatura.  In a period preoccupied with gender roles, social class distinctions, and political power, and dominated by courts and dynastic states, the boundaries of masculinity were a particular anxiety.  The self could be fashioned or constructed in portraits, self-portraits, and autobiographies, as well as through clothing, bearing, gesture, manners, speech, and the display of material goods.  The course also considers some of the public and private settings in which the social self was performed, among them banquets and studies.  In a time of travel, the internationalism of consumer goods, and a fascination with distinctions in dress throughout the known world, identity was also negotiated between the familiar and the foreign.
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ARTH 4514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Imagination
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6514, ASRC 4514, ASRC 6514 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the intersection of Africana/Black Studies and Postcolonial Studies.  Although the two fields are often perceived as being distinct from one another, in reality they overlap in significant ways as the result of the immense contributions of African and African Diaspora theorists and intellectuals to the rise and evolution of postcolonial studies. Course readings include original texts by theorists and scholars such as Frantz Fanon, Aimé Cesaire, W E B DuBois, Albert Memmi, Edouard Glissant, Leopold Cedar Senghor, C.L.R. James, Amilcar Cabral, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o in addition to Nawal Sadawi, Edward Said,and Gayatri Spivak among others.  In addition, we will explore the contributions made to both fields by feminist, gender, race, and sexuality studies.
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ARTH 4774 : Indigenous Spaces and Materiality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4774, ANTHR 7774, ART 3874, ARTH 6774 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Materials will be considered as willful agents within artistic processes across key moments in history by tracing the flow of wampum from the east coast, recognizing the shift from shell to glass during the fur trade up to the emergence of digital experimentation. The introduction of multiple modernities structures the shift from art historical framings of form over matter and connoisseurship to viewing materiality as an active process that continues to map larger social processes and transformation. Archives will be sites of investigation across varied Indigenous geographies marking place, space, bodies and land.
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ARTH 4816 : Modern Chinese Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6816, ASIAN 4473, ASIAN 6673 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
China, a cultural giant of East Asia, made a passive entrance into modernity. With the advent of Western and American colonialism and imperialism, coupled with recent successes in westernization by the Japanese, Chinese artists had to redefine their roles as well as their visions. This turmoil bore witness to a vibrant beginning in modern Chinese art. Interactions between the Chinese themselves, and Chinese interactions with foreigners in the major cities of Shanghai and Beijing, fostered new directions in Chinese art and helped shape western visions of Chinese art history. Issues covered include: Chinese debates on western influence--their theoretical foundations and rationales; New visions for the future of Chinese art in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Pluralistic approaches and arguments on "Chinese identity" in the modern era; Collecting art and the vision of history; The identity of traditional literati painters in the modern era-their roles, artworks, and deeds; Foreigners in China-the formation of major European collections of Chinese art, and the formation of "Chinese art history" in the West.
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ARTH 4991 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 4998 : Honors Work I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A course for senior Art History majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the History of Art faculty.
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ARTH 5991 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5993 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 6000 : Graduate Research Methods in Art History
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar introduces graduate students to a range of methodologies and approaches to teaching and researching topics in art history and visual studies. Each week, a member of the faculty will present his or her work to the seminar, highlighting unique research approaches, areas of specialty, technological challenges, and professional and pedagogical rewards. Topics include defining a research question; conducting archival research and fieldwork; syllabus design; identifying funding sources; and grant proposal writing. This course is required for all art history Ph.D. students and open to graduate students from other departments. Students are encouraged to use current technologies for presenting their coursework, including the creation of a blog for documenting ongoing research questions related to their teaching and dissertation.
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ARTH 6101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3101, VISST 3101 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
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Description
ARTH 6153 : Topics in Feminist Media Arts
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4153, FGSS 4153, FGSS 6153, VISST 4153 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Topic for fall 2017: Feminist Posthumanisms in the Visual Arts.
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ARTH 6308 : Expanded Practice Seminar
Crosslisted as: ARCH 6308, SHUM 6308 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Expanded Practice Seminars bring students and faculty in the humanities and the design disciplines together around a common and pressing urban issue such as the cultural and material practices induced by national or ethnic divisions; the increasingly leaky taxonomy of the terra firma in areas where land/water boundaries are rapidly changing; and the inadequacy of static zoning models that fail to capture dynamic, urban economics and performance. The intent of the Expanded Practice Seminar is to study complex urban conditions using theoretical and analytic tools derived in equal part from the design disciplines and humanist studies. The Expanded Practice Seminar includes a site visit to experience the conditions under study and meet with local experts, designers, and authorities.  Expanded Practice Seminars are offered under the auspices of Cornell University's Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Collaborative Studies in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities grant.
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ARTH 6440 : Constructing the Self in the 16th Century
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4440, VISST 4440 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines issues of identity and self-fashioning in the 16th century in early modern Europe, especially Italy.  The proliferation of courtesy manuals, most famous of them by Castiglione, instructed in "civility," and reflected the concern with manners, appearance, and the ideal characteristics of grace and sprezzatura.  In a period preoccupied with gender roles, social class distinctions, and political power, and dominated by courts and dynastic states, the boundaries of masculinity were a particular anxiety.  The self could be fashioned or constructed in portraits, self-portraits, and autobiographies, as well as through clothing, bearing, gesture, manners, speech, and the display of material goods.  The course also considers some of the public and private settings in which the social self was performed, among them banquets and studies.  In a time of travel, the internationalism of consumer goods, and a fascination with distinctions in dress throughout the known world, identity was also negotiated between the familiar and the foreign.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Imagination
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4514, ASRC 4514, ASRC 6514 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the intersection of Africana/Black Studies and Postcolonial Studies.  Although the two fields are often perceived as being distinct from one another, in reality they overlap in significant ways as the result of the immense contributions of African and African Diaspora theorists and intellectuals to the rise and evolution of postcolonial studies. Course readings include original texts by theorists and scholars such as Frantz Fanon, Aimé Cesaire, W E B DuBois, Albert Memmi, Edouard Glissant, Leopold Cedar Senghor, C.L.R. James, Amilcar Cabral, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o in addition to Nawal Sadawi, Edward Said,and Gayatri Spivak among others.  In addition, we will explore the contributions made to both fields by feminist, gender, race, and sexuality studies.
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ARTH 6650 : Race, Gender, and Crossing Water: Narratives of Mobility and Escape in the Nineteenth Century US
Crosslisted as: AMST 6650, ENGL 6650, FGSS 6651 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course sets out to explore a series of narratives produced in the 19th-century U.S. that imagine movement through and across water in both actual and metaphorical terms. These narratives will include such classics as Beloved, Moby-Dick, and Huckleberry Finn. They will also include lesser read accounts such as The Morgesons and Ten Nights in a Bar Room. As a class, we will ask questions about the different boundaries that water produces for considering geographies of race and gender. We will read theoretical texts about identity, nationalism, and literature, as well as considering primary material from the nineteenth century.
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ARTH 6774 : Indigenous Spaces and Materiality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4774, ANTHR 7774, ART 3874, ARTH 4774 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Materials will be considered as willful agents within artistic processes across key moments in history by tracing the flow of wampum from the east coast, recognizing the shift from shell to glass during the fur trade up to the emergence of digital experimentation. The introduction of multiple modernities structures the shift from art historical framings of form over matter and connoisseurship to viewing materiality as an active process that continues to map larger social processes and transformation. Archives will be sites of investigation across varied Indigenous geographies marking place, space, bodies and land.
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ARTH 6780 : Persecution and the Art of Writing
Crosslisted as: COML 6661, GERST 6780, GOVT 6785, JWST 6780 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Our title derives from the political philosopher Leo Strauss, who provides our initial analytic, methodological, and theoretical model. We extend beyond Straussian ideological positions to include art unrestricted to written philosophy and literature, namely: painting, music, cinema, and Reason of State. Persecution (via censorship or heterodoxy) is understood as being both externally imposed and internalized. "The double rhetoric" or "esotericism," hence "writing between the lines," has its millennial history since archaic times. After discussing practices (from before Plato to Machiavelli, Spinoza, Bayle, Toland, Swift) we focus on recent techniques of "concealing messages" across disciplines, periods, places. Examples include Lessing (on Free Masons), Hegel (as read by Left-Hegelians and by Marx), Gramsci (Prison Notebooks); also Nietzsche, Heidegger, Freud, Wittgenstein, Carl Schmitt, Strauss, Dickinson, and their legacies.  
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ARTH 6816 : Modern Chinese Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4816, ASIAN 4473, ASIAN 6673 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
China, a cultural giant of East Asia, made a passive entrance into modernity. With the advent of Western and American colonialism and imperialism, coupled with recent successes in westernization by the Japanese, Chinese artists had to redefine their roles as well as their visions. This turmoil bore witness to a vibrant beginning in modern Chinese art. Interactions between the Chinese themselves, and Chinese interactions with foreigners in the major cities of Shanghai and Beijing, fostered new directions in Chinese art and helped shape western visions of Chinese art history. Issues covered include: Chinese debates on western influence--their theoretical foundations and rationales; New visions for the future of Chinese art in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Pluralistic approaches and arguments on "Chinese identity" in the modern era; Collecting art and the vision of history; The identity of traditional literati painters in the modern era-their roles, artworks, and deeds; Foreigners in China-the formation of major European collections of Chinese art, and the formation of "Chinese art history" in the West.
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ARTH 6901 : Ancient Art in Upstate New York
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3901 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This tutorial investigates ancient art in collections (private and museums) in Upstate New York. Students learn to properly describe, document (in word and image), identify and finally present or publish the individual objects in an online exhibition and catalogue. (Theme for fall 2017: Roman sculpture at Sonnenberg Gardens, NY).
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