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ARTH 1162 : FWS: Constellations: Relating Image and Text
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar considers art and visual culture as sites through which we engage history, philosophy, and the world around us. From art objects to movies, book covers to social media we encounter images constantly and in all arenas of our lives. Given the pervasiveness of visual stimuli, this seminar will use the idea of constellations to rearrange and interpret images. Most of us know Picasso's Guernica. But can we make sense of it beyond our memorized knowledge if we placed it within the context of excerpts from a story by the Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez and an aerial video of Aleppo that was shot in 2016? Writing will be our tool to construct meaningful constellations from images and texts and critically engage our visual worlds anew.
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ARTH 1163 : FWS: Origins of Photography
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will allow freshmen to answer the question: from where, and how, did the idea evolve that one might catch a picture in a net, as one might catch not only a butterfly but the piece of sky in which it flew?  By discovering how photography evolved, students will learn how many forces—artistic, scientific, technological, political, phenomenological, and structural—are responsible for the appearance of a single invention and idea.  Episodes from the history of optics, perspective drawing, mapmaking, landscape, chemistry, view painting, will be glimpsed (1300-1800) as well as the race to capture the image in the camera obscura (1800-1839) and an introduction to early photographic processes (1839-1870).
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ARTH 2000 : Introduction to Visual Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 2000, COML 2000, VISST 2000 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce you to the field of Visual Studies.  Visual Studies seeks to define and improve our visual relationship to nature and culture after the modern surge in technology and knowledge.  Our field contains objects, images, and problems that lie beyond the fine art boundaries of Art History and the methodological boundaries of experimental science, yet is grown using seeds from both academic cultures.  If you see yourself as a "visual person" and want to explore your interests within both science and art, then this is the course for you.  You will learn the physical and legal limits of human, animal, and machine vision, how knowledge and power gets into images, how spectacle drives the economy, and savvy techniques of analysis that will help you deliver fresh perspectives to whatever course of study you follow.
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ARTH 2355 : Introduction to Art History: Medieval Art and Culture
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2355 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Survey lecture course covering the creation, encoding, and reception of Medieval (roughly AD 500-1500) European, Byzantine, and Islamic architecture, ornament, manuscripts, liturgical and luxury objects.  The approach is thematic but chronologically grounded; attention is also given to cultural interaction in the Mediterranean basin.
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ARTH 3010 : Photography and the American Dream
Crosslisted as: AMST 3010, ART 3810, VISST 3010 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Who are 'the poor' in the United States? Who are the largest recipients of federal welfare and entitlement spending? Why is there an unprecedented simultaneous increase in wealth and poverty in the United States at this point in its history? What role does photography play in our understanding and misunderstanding of poverty in 'the greatest country in the world?' In this course we will explore the perceptions of poverty in the United States through three major American newspapers.
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VISST 3176 : Global Cinema II
Crosslisted as: PMA 3551, PMA 6551 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history.
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ARTH 3225 : Archaic & Classical Greece
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3225, CLASS 3735 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.
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ARTH 3440 : Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael, and their World
Crosslisted as: VISST 3443 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael transformed the art of their time. Leonardo was an extraordinary thinker, scientist, and engineer as well as artist. Michelangelo invented grandiose projects for ambitious patrons and created a novel visual language with parallels to his poetry, and in his later years, profoundly spiritual images. Raphael, the consummate court artist, antiquarian, and archaeologist, produced a new classical style. Leonardo and Michelangelo pioneered new approaches to the study and representation of the human body. They deployed wit and humor and reinvented the grotesque from ancient art, and all influenced the proliferation of erotic art. Biographies presented them as geniuses, leading the Florentine sculptor Cellini to model himself in his autobiography on a larger-than-life Michelangelo. Florentine painters and sculptors grappled with Michelangelo's enormous inventiveness. We will also examine prints in the Johnson Museum after Michelangelo and Raphael, and consider recent attributions of new discoveries to them.
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VISST 3560 : Computing Cultures
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3061, COMM 3560, INFO 3561, STS 3561 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.
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ARTH 3565 : Art & Architecture of Colonial Latin America
Crosslisted as: LATA 3565, VISST 3565 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course surveys the artistic and architectural traditions of Latin America during the period of Spanish colonial rule (ca. 1520s-1820s).  It will center on visual cultures of the viceroyalties of New Spain (Mexico) and Peru, but will also incorporate sections on the colonial Caribbean, the northern Andes, and Brazil.  The course explores the legacy of pre-Columbian visual traditions in the colonial era as well as the lasting impact of colonial artistic practices in modern and contemporary Latin America.  It will also examine colonial Latin America as the crossroads of dynamic artistic and cultural interaction between indigenous, European, and African-descended groups.  Topics to be explored include issues of visual translation and transmission, art and agency, and the creation of new colonial artistic practices and idioms.
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ARTH 3651 : Women in New Media Art
Crosslisted as: FGSS 3655, VISST 3651 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The work of women artists has been central to the development of new media art. These rich and varied practices include installation, virtual reality environments, net art, digital video, networked performance, tactical media, video games, remix and robotics. This course will begin with an overview of feminist art and early experiments in performance and video art to then investigate multiple currents of digital media. Discussions will focus primarily on works by women artists from Europe, the Americas and Australia.
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VISST 3758 : Technology and the Moving Body I
Crosslisted as: PMA 3350, PMA 4350, VISST 4758 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Formally titled "technosomakinesics," this class works to expand the specific aesthetics related to dance as embodied performance. Included in the process is the analysis of built environments that both inspire and are designed to be inhabited by these disciplines. This studio course explores the resulting neoperformance forms being created within the range of digital media processing; such as gallery installations, multimedia dance-theatre, personal interactive media (games and digital art) and web projects. Computer-imaging and sound-production programs are examined and used in the class work (human form-animation software, vocal recording and digital editing, digital-imaging tools. The new context of digital performance raises questions concerning the use of traditional lighting, set, costume, and sound-design techniques that are examined as they are repositioned by digital-translation tools with the goal of creating experimental and/or conceptual multimedia performance and/or installation work. Theoretical texts on dance and theatrical performance, film studies, the dynamic social body, architecture, and digital technology are also used to support conceptual creative work.
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VISST 3760 : American Cinema since 1968
Crosslisted as: AMST 3760, PMA 3560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1968, amongst cultural and political turmoil, the American film industry adopted the ratings system, which helped usher in the kinds of cinema we know today. This course focuses on developments in U.S. cinema since then: its politics, technological and economic transformations, relationship to other media, and changing ways in which people consume it. A main focus will be the aesthetic developments of films themselves: new and changing genres, new visual styles, new ways of storytelling, and ways in which new voices and visions have emerged. Weekly screenings will include mainstream, independent, and documentary films. The course can be taken as a complement to "American Cinema" (AMST 2760) or independently.
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ARTH 3800 : Introduction to the Arts of China
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3800, ASIAN 3383 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers a survey of the art and culture of China, from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. We begin with an inquiry into the meaning of national boundaries and the controversy of the Han Chinese people, which helps us identify the scope of Chinese culture. Pre-dynastic (or prehistoric) Chinese culture is presented through both legends about the origins of the Chinese, and scientifically excavated artifacts. Art of the dynastic and modern periods is presented in light of contemporaneous social, political, geographical, philosophical and religious contexts. Students work directly with objects in the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.
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ARTH 3850 : The Arts of Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3350, VISST 3696 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The arts of Southeast Asia are studied in their social context, since in traditional societies creative processes are often mapped on the sequence of events that compose human lives. We will be looking particularly at the gendered ways in which bodies are mapped on the land, and how these various framings are often reflected in the unique relationships that emerge between works of art and textual sources.
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ARTH 3902 : Curatorial Interventions
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6902 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The intersectionality between the political landscapes of nation spaces, economic and political forces will be undertaken through curatorial practices for museums and the art market including international biennials. What is the value in considering internal nation-state and Indigenous relationships on the international scene through artistic expression? Can this kind of international art world attention divulge anything missed in more direct political engagement? Reconsider curating practice as an intervention in the role museums and art world spaces play in the process of decolonization and the flow of cultural knowledge. Structured as a tutorial, this is a reading and discussion intensive course with limited enrollment.
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ARTH 4155 : Topics in Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6155, LATA 4155, LATA 6155, VISST 4155, VISST 6155 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will investigate question such, such as: How does the inclusion of technologically engaged practices in the history of Latin American art challenge our understanding of this art? Are there regional specificities to the use and understanding of media technologies? Are modern technologies relevant to the representation of national identities? Has the dissemination of digital technologies contributed to preserve cultural memory? To what extent do technologically engaged practices contribute to indigenous social movements and aesthetics? To what extent do contemporary media artists invoke the indigenous and colonial past in their work? Is Latin American digital art indifferent to social realities? Are existing theories of globalization and comparative modernities adequate to understand this work? Can artists' engagements with technology stimulate the development of new historical and critical discourses about Latin American art? Diverse disciplinary and methodological approaches will be included and welcomed.
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ARTH 4160 : Topics in Colonial Encounters
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6160, LATA 4160, LATA 6160, VISST 4160 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The colonial period in Latin America (circa 1521-1820s) witnessed the formation of one of the most diverse societies in the world.  Labor regimes, religious activities, marriage alliances, and commercial contacts engendered by the Spanish colonial enterprise brought Spaniards, Africans, and Indigenous peoples into dynamic contact.  This cross-fertilization of cultures resulted in the construction of new cultural categories and colonial identities whose reverberations continue to be felt into the present day.  This seminar explores the role that visual culture played in the articulation of identity in Latin America.  For the purposes of this seminar, "identity" can be loosely defined as the overlapping allegiances to which one ascribes, whether racial, cultural, gendered, religious, or community-based.  The visual culture of colonial Latin America can reveal multitudes on the construction of self and community across temporal and geographical contexts.  We will explore a variety of colonial Latin American objects and images, including paintings, textiles, and material culture.  Our discussions of images will be guided by readings on hybridity, coloniality, cross-cultural exchange, and the early modern Atlantic world.
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ARTH 4171 : 19th Century Art and Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An examination and analysis of the major trends in art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Post Impressionism and the dawn of the twentieth century. Lectures and readings will concentrate on the historical context of great masterpieces by seminal artists. The class will investigate the imagery and theoretical foundation of nineteenth-century European and American art using a selection of appropriate methodological approaches. Major figures to be discussed include David, Copley, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Cole, Manet, Morisot, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Rodin, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Part of each class will be devoted to discussions of the readings. Two classes will be held in the National Gallery of Art at times and dates to be determined. Exams, a term paper, and class participation will be used for evaluative purposes.
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ARTH 4353 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from  prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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ARTH 4558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4558, ARKEO 6558, ARTH 6558, JWST 4558, JWST 6558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how memory has been expressed in Jewish tradition in physical and spatial form, especially though the creation of commemorative objects, records, markers, monuments and museums. The second half of the class will focus on creation, design, use, and reception of Holocaust memorials and museums, and broader "landscapes of memory" including engagement in several ongoing memorial projects.  We will consider question such as: Who makes memory objects and why? Who visits memory sites and how does their meaning change over time or with different audiences? Where and how do individual and collective commemoration events intersect?  Beginning with Holocaust monuments and museums in Europe, Israel and America, we will look back on older traditions of commemoration in Jewish tradition and compare and link these – as in the case of ancient tombs, 20th century war memorials and Holocaust museums - to broader commemorative trends and artistic tastes.
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VISST 4563 : Lighting Design Studio II
Crosslisted as: PMA 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Concentrates on designing lighting for different genres of performance in various venues. Emphasis is placed on developing both the visual sophistication and the technical artistry of the lighting designer. Commitment, personal style, and professional presentation are stressed.
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ARTH 4606 : Rembrandt: Flesh Paint Performance
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6606 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Rembrandt was typical and exceptional in seventeenth-century Holland: typical because subject to the same market forces as others, and exceptional because he flouted that market, alienated patrons, innovating at every step. Both highly regarded and greatly reviled in his time, modern scholars have understood Rembrandt's work variously: saying that "every generation creates its own Rembrandt." We will attempt to determine what Rembrandt is ours.
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VISST 4620 : Undocumentation
Crosslisted as: AMST 4620, COML 4616, FGSS 4620, LATA 4620, LSP 4621, ROMS 4625, SHUM 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will sustain a particular reading of post-1984 Mexico-US border cultural production as "undocumentation." Specifically, we will focus on performance, conceptual, and cinematic practices that corrupt the spreadsheet and the exposé; that reflect their makers' commitments to portraying extreme labor situations in a period of greater Mexican neoliberal transition now synonymous with NAFTA, culture and drug wars, and border militarization and maquilization. Assigned texts will include artwork by the Border Art Workshop and Elizabeth Sisco, Louis Hock, and David Avalos; writing by Gloria Anzaldúa, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Sara Uribe, and Sergio González Rodríguez; contributions to the Tijuana-San Diego installation festival inSITE; and "undocumentaries" like Alex Rivera's Borders Trilogy, Sergio De La Torre and Vicki Funari's Maquilapolis, and Natalia Almada's El Velador.
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VISST 4758 : Technology and the Moving Body II
Crosslisted as: PMA 3350, PMA 4350, VISST 3758 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of PMA 3350. PMA 4350 expands on principles explored in PMA 3350 using more complex and interactive software and spatialities. Students must create work utilizing projections and built objects or interactive web based projects.
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VISST 4793 : Advanced Film and Video Projects
Crosslisted as: PMA 4585 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A continuation of PMA 3570, Introduction to Visual Storytelling, students will dive deeper into creating story driven short form narratives. Students will have the opportunity to develop and produce a short film over the course of the semester.  The expectation is the follow through of the filmmaking process, from story development, preproduction, production, post production and distribution. Students are expected to collaborate heavily and crew on each other's film productions, in various roles. Final film projects will be screened in a public, open-campus event at the end of the semester.
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ARTH 4820 : Art in Zen and Zen in Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6820, ASIAN 4450, ASIAN 6650 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores how the art of Zen (Chan) developed in China and was transmitted to Korea and Japan. It will also examine how ideas of Zen informed Western Modern art in both Europe and North America, and how these artistic ideas in turn influenced postwar abstract art in many parts of the world.
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ARTH 4851 : Performing Objects/Collecting Cultures
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6851, ASIAN 4445, ASIAN 6645, VISST 4851 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The twin phenomena of performing and collecting are as old as time, and both require an intense entanglement with things. This seminar examines the significance of objects and their related texts within the field of Art History and, indeed, more broadly as they are "performed" and "collected" (sometimes both initiatives occurring simultaneously) in Asian Art and Culture. Various performative and collective containments will be mapped as they transcend boundaries: temporal, spatial, cultural, intertexual, and disciplinary.  Masked dances and their costume elements, clay pots, bronzes, serpentine daggers, musical instruments, embroidered story cloths, shadow puppets, flora, fauna, and film will be explored.
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VISST 4945 : Body Politics in African Literature and Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4995, COML 4945, ENGL 4995, FGSS 4945, LGBT 4945 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course examines how postcolonial African writers and filmmakers engage with and revise controversial images of bodies and sexuality--genital cursing, same-sex desire, HIV/AIDS, genital surgeries, etc. Our inquiry also surveys African theorists' troubling of problematic tropes and practices such as the conception in 19th-century racist writings of the colonized as embodiment, the pathologization and hypersexualization of colonized bodies, and the precarious and yet empowering nature of the body and sexuality in the postcolonial African experience. As we focus on African artists and theorists, we also read American and European theorists, including but not certainly limited to Giorgio Agamben, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and Joseph Slaughter, detecting the ways in which discourses around bodies in the African context may shape contemporary theories and vice versa.
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ARTH 4992 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 4999 : Honors Work II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The student under faculty direction prepares a senior thesis.
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ARTH 5992 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5994 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 6155 : Topics in Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4155, LATA 4155, LATA 6155, VISST 4155, VISST 6155 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will investigate question such, such as: How does the inclusion of technologically engaged practices in the history of Latin American art challenge our understanding of this art? Are there regional specificities to the use and understanding of media technologies? Are modern technologies relevant to the representation of national identities? Has the dissemination of digital technologies contributed to preserve cultural memory? To what extent do technologically engaged practices contribute to indigenous social movements and aesthetics? To what extent do contemporary media artists invoke the indigenous and colonial past in their work? Is Latin American digital art indifferent to social realities? Are existing theories of globalization and comparative modernities adequate to understand this work? Can artists' engagements with technology stimulate the development of new historical and critical discourses about Latin American art? Diverse disciplinary and methodological approaches will be included and welcomed.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6160 : Topics in Colonial Encounters
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4160, LATA 4160, LATA 6160, VISST 4160 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The colonial period in Latin America (circa 1521-1820s) witnessed the formation of one of the most diverse societies in the world.  Labor regimes, religious activities, marriage alliances, and commercial contacts engendered by the Spanish colonial enterprise brought Spaniards, Africans, and Indigenous peoples into dynamic contact.  This cross-fertilization of cultures resulted in the construction of new cultural categories and colonial identities whose reverberations continue to be felt into the present day.  This seminar explores the role that visual culture played in the articulation of identity in Latin America.  For the purposes of this seminar, "identity" can be loosely defined as the overlapping allegiances to which one ascribes, whether racial, cultural, gendered, religious, or community-based.  The visual culture of colonial Latin America can reveal multitudes on the construction of self and community across temporal and geographical contexts.  We will explore a variety of colonial Latin American objects and images, including paintings, textiles, and material culture.  Our discussions of images will be guided by readings on hybridity, coloniality, cross-cultural exchange, and the early modern Atlantic world.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6353 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4558, ARKEO 6558, ARTH 4558, JWST 4558, JWST 6558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how memory has been expressed in Jewish tradition in physical and spatial form, especially though the creation of commemorative objects, records, markers, monuments and museums. The second half of the class will focus on creation, design, use, and reception of Holocaust memorials and museums, and broader "landscapes of memory" including engagement in several ongoing memorial projects.  We will consider question such as: Who makes memory objects and why? Who visits memory sites and how does their meaning change over time or with different audiences? Where and how do individual and collective commemoration events intersect?  Beginning with Holocaust monuments and museums in Europe, Israel and America, we will look back on older traditions of commemoration in Jewish tradition and compare and link these – as in the case of ancient tombs, 20th century war memorials and Holocaust museums - to broader commemorative trends and artistic tastes.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6606 : Rembrandt: Flesh Paint Performance
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4606 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Rembrandt was typical and exceptional in seventeenth-century Holland: typical because subject to the same market forces as others, and exceptional because he flouted that market, alienated patrons, innovating at every step. Both highly regarded and greatly reviled in his time, modern scholars have understood Rembrandt's work variously, saying that "every generation creates its own Rembrandt." We will attempt to determine what Rembrandt is ours.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6820 : Art in Zen and Zen in Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4820, ASIAN 4450, ASIAN 6650 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores how the art of Zen (Chan) developed in China and was transmitted to Korea and Japan. It will also examine how ideas of Zen informed Western Modern art in both Europe and North America, and how these artistic ideas in turn influenced postwar abstract art in many parts of the world.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6851 : Performing Objects/Collecting Cultures
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4851, ASIAN 4445, ASIAN 6645, VISST 4851 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The twin phenomena of performing and collecting are as old as time, and both require an intense entanglement with things. This seminar examines the significance of objects and their related texts within the field of Art History and, indeed, more broadly as they are "performed" and "collected" (sometimes both initiatives occurring simultaneously) in Asian Art and Culture. Various performative and collective containments will be mapped as they transcend boundaries: temporal, spatial, cultural, intertexual, and disciplinary. Masked dances and their costume elements, clay pots, bronzes, serpentine daggers, musical instruments, embroidered story cloths, shadow puppets, flora, fauna, and film will be explored.
View course details
Description
ARTH 6902 : Curatorial Interventions
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3902 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The intersectionality between the political landscapes of nation spaces, economic and political forces will be undertaken through curatorial practices for museums and the art market including international biennials. What is the value in considering internal nation-state and Indigenous relationships on the international scene through artistic expression? Can this kind of international art world attention divulge anything missed in more direct political engagement? Reconsider curating practice as an intervention in the role museums and art world spaces play in the process of decolonization and the flow of cultural knowledge. Structured as a tutorial, this is a reading and discussion intensive course with limited enrollment.
View course details
Description