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ARTH 1100 : Art Histories: An Introduction
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This lecture course introduces students to the History of Art as a global and interdisciplinary field. Team-taught by several professors from the department in collaboration with educators and curators from the Herbert Johnson Museum of Art, its aim is to familiarize students with the most significant areas, epochs and works of art as well as with methods to study them. The course will be organized around specific themes central to the history of art. The topic for 2018 is "World Art, Technology, and the Environment." This theme will examine the intersections of art, technology, and the environment from antiquity to the present in various geographical areas and illustrate their interdependence with material examples from the art historical archive. Art works include stone and brick architecture; cement; textiles; stone, bronze and plaster sculpture; oil paintings; prints; photography; film and digital media.
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VISST 1101 : Visual Literacy and Design Studio
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an introductory design studio.  The primary course objective is to introduce principles of visual literacy as it pertains to two-dimensional and three-dimensional issues in design at all scales.  Concepts about representation, expression, composition, color, form, light, structure, and function will be explored through project based learning.  The emphasis will be on learning explicit compositional concepts, visualization skills, and media techniques as well as implicit design sensitivities to serve the student throughout the rest of his or her DEA experience and beyond.
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ARTH 1162 : FWS: Constellations: Relating Image and Text
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar considers art and visual culture as sites through which we engage history, philosophy, and the world around us. From art objects to movies, book covers to social media we encounter images constantly and in all arenas of our lives. Given the pervasiveness of visual stimuli, this seminar will use the idea of constellations to rearrange and interpret images. Most of us know Picasso's Guernica. But can we make sense of it beyond our memorized knowledge if we placed it within the context of excerpts from a story by the Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez and an aerial video of Aleppo that was shot in 2016? Writing will be our tool to construct meaningful constellations from images and texts and critically engage our visual worlds anew.
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ARTH 1163 : FWS: Origins of Photography
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will allow freshmen to answer the question: from where, and how, did the idea evolve that one might catch a picture in a net, as one might catch not only a butterfly but the piece of sky in which it flew?  By discovering how photography evolved, students will learn how many forces—artistic, scientific, technological, political, phenomenological, and structural—are responsible for the appearance of a single invention and idea.  Episodes from the history of optics, perspective drawing, mapmaking, landscape, chemistry, view painting, will be glimpsed (1300-1800) as well as the race to capture the image in the camera obscura (1800-1839) and an introduction to early photographic processes (1839-1870).
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ARTH 1165 : FWS: Art History's Frame: Writing Across Art, Law, Technology & Other Fields
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Artists since the 1960s have turned their attention from "work" to" frame" by intervening in exhibitions, questioning how art history is written, and making "the context" of art a central concern. This class draws inspiration from that charge to take an expanded view of the authors and texts comprising modern and contemporary art history, and considers art's relationship to seemingly unrelated areas like law, finance, and government. Beginning with an overview of Conceptual art and Institutional Critique, readings include artists' books, activist manifestos, oral histories, biography, as well as legal documents and financial analyses. Assignments reflect this interdisciplinarity through archival research and artist interviews, writing Wikipedia entries and exhibition labels, inviting us to reconsider – and re-write – the authoritative record through which cultural history is framed.
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ARTH 2000 : Introduction to Visual Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 2000, COML 2000, VISST 2000 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce you to the field of Visual Studies.  Visual Studies seeks to define and improve our visual relationship to nature and culture after the modern surge in technology and knowledge.  Our field contains objects, images, and problems that lie beyond the fine art boundaries of Art History and the methodological boundaries of experimental science, yet is grown using seeds from both academic cultures.  If you see yourself as a "visual person" and want to explore your interests within both science and art, then this is the course for you.  You will learn the physical and legal limits of human, animal, and machine vision, how knowledge and power gets into images, how spectacle drives the economy, and savvy techniques of analysis that will help you deliver fresh perspectives to whatever course of study you follow.
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VISST 2174 : Introduction to Film Analysis: Meaning and Value
Crosslisted as: PMA 2540 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ARTH 2200 : Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2700, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What is the origin of the Olympic games? Why are the most famous Greek vases found in Italy? What was the "worlds' first computer" used for? What can a brick tell us about still standing Roman buildings? This course on the art and archaeology of ancient Greece and Rome will address all these questions. Covering the time span from the Bronze Age (3rd millennium BCE) to the time of Constantine the Great (4th century CE), the class will focus on one object or monument per lecture and how it can be considered exemplary for its time. Students learn about and practice different ways of how to look at and analyze material evidence.
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ARTH 2255 : Ecocriticism & Visual Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 2255 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course attempts to reconcile the split between art and science through a pluralistic perspective of environmental artistic processes. What is the role of visual culture in sustainable development? Cataclysmic change in the world has forced a turn in environmental art from isolated practices to having a fundamental role in shaping the transformation of our relationships to nature. Informed by Western and Indigenous philosophies, trace how artists enact ecological micro-utopias from earth art to ecological art as a catalyst for social change.
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VISST 2300 : American Cinema
Crosslisted as: AMST 2760, ENGL 2761, PMA 2560 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
From the beginning of the twentieth century to the present moment, movies -- and in particular Hollywood -- have profoundly influenced the ways in which people see, think and talk about the world. Focusing mostly on Hollywood film, this course introduces the study of American cinema from multiple perspectives: as an economy and mode of production; as an art form that produces particular aesthetic styles; as a cultural institution that comments on contemporary issues and allows people to socialize. We will consider the rise of Hollywood in the age of mass production; the star system; the introduction of sound and the function of the soundtrack; Hollywood's rivalry with television; censorship; the rise of independent film, etc. Weekly screenings introduce major American genres (e.g. science fiction, film noir, the musical) and directors (e.g. Hitchcock, Kubrick, Tarantino).
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ARTH 2355 : Introduction to Art History: Medieval Art and Culture
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2355 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Survey lecture course covering the creation, encoding, and reception of Medieval (roughly AD 500-1500) European, Byzantine, and Islamic architecture, ornament, manuscripts, liturgical and luxury objects.  The approach is thematic but chronologically grounded; attention is also given to cultural interaction in the Mediterranean basin.
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ARTH 2400 : Introduction to Renaissance and Baroque Art and Society
Crosslisted as: VISST 2645 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines some of the major works of European artists from 1400 to 1750, a period with huge changes in religion, political systems, and knowledge of the world. We learn chronological and geographical differences in artistic aims and styles, and explore various goals, among them representing the human body and emotions, telling stories, serving religious practices through visual images, and fashioning identities of different social classes. With the rediscovery of classical antiquity, both intellectuals and artists sought ways to synthesize classical and Christian. Tales of mythological gods could also convey philosophical ideas, gender relations, and concerns of love and lust. Artists include Jan van Eyck, Botticelli, Dürer, Bosch, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Velazquez, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, among many others.
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VISST 2502 : Playing out Difference: History and Identity in Sports Film
Crosslisted as: AMST 2505, FGSS 2501, PMA 2501 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
VISST 2511 : Beginning Dance Composition
Crosslisted as: PMA 2300, PMA 3300, PMA 4300, PMA 4301 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Weekly assignments in basic elements of choreography. Students compose and present short studies that are discussed and reworked. Problems are defined and explored through class improvisations. Informal showing at end of semester. Includes informal showing of work.
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ARTH 2600 : Introduction to Modern Western Art, from the Age of Revolutions to the Age of Capital
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course surveys major artistic movements and artists in Europe and the United States from the French Revolution to the rise of Abstract Expressionism in 1950s New York. It introduces students to the study of "modernism" as a broad designation of the defining aesthetic innovations of this period. The course will consider the main currents of modernism with a focus on both formal analysis and historical context: Neoclassicism and Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, the Russian and Soviet avant-garde, Abstraction, Dada and Surrealism, the School of Paris and Abstract Expressionism. Major themes will include the onset of capitalist development within a metropole-colonial world system, the arrival of new scientific and technological discoveries promising transformations of everyday life, the emergence of new forms of individual and collective experience, and the impact of revolutionary political alignments on avant-garde practice and the novel theorizations which addressed it. Finally, the course will consider the formative encounters of various modernisms with a non-European world of art, and offer critical perspectives on the contemporary philosophical responses to this encounter.
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VISST 2744 : Gamelan in Indonesian History and Cultures
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2245, MUSIC 1341 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course combines hands-on instruction in gamelan, Indonesia's most prominent form of traditional music, and the academic study of the broader range of music found in contemporary Indonesia, including Western-oriented and hybrid popular forms. Students thus engage with music directly, and use it as a lens to examine the myriad social and cultural forces that shape it, and that are shaped by it.
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ARTH 2805 : Introduction to Material Worlds: Trade and the Arts of Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2285, VISST 2805 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Trade in and to Asia proved to be a key force in creating our modern "globalized" world.  The Indian Ocean and the China Seas converged on Southeast Asia, where a cosmopolitan array of ships from every shore plied their trade, set sail, and returned with the monsoon winds.  People, goods, and ideas also traveled on camelback across the undulating contours of the Gobi Desert, connecting India, the Near East and Central Asia with China, Korea, and Japan. This course introduces students to the raw ingredients of things in motion, poised interactively in time and space, as material worlds collide. Wood, bamboo, bronze, clay, earthenware, ink, spices, textiles and tea - students will navigate sites of encounter at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum from pre modern to the present.
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ARTH 3010 : Photography and the American Dream
Crosslisted as: AMST 3010, ART 3810, VISST 3010 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Who are 'the poor' in the United States? Who are the largest recipients of federal welfare and entitlement spending? Why is there an unprecedented simultaneous increase in wealth and poverty in the United States at this point in its history? What role does photography play in our understanding and misunderstanding of poverty in 'the greatest country in the world?' In this course we will explore the perceptions of poverty in the United States through three major American newspapers.
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ARTH 3100 : History of Photography
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How did photography become the world's most dominant kind of visual representation?  This course investigates photography's scientific origins and complex relations to painting, portraiture, urban life, war, anthropology, exploration and travel, and labor and industry.  By the 20th century we find photography enriched new developments that include its use as a modernist and experimental art form, in social documentary and photojournalism, in propaganda, in advertising and fashion, and its centrality in the practice of conceptual art, postmodernism, and the art and surveillance of the digital age.
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VISST 3175 : Global Cinema I
Crosslisted as: PMA 3550, PMA 6550 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history. Global Cinema I covers the period from 1895 to 1960. Precise topics will vary from year to year, but may include: early silent cinema; the emergence of Hollywood as industry and a "classical" narrative form; Soviet, German, French and Chinese film cultures; the coming of sound; interwar documentary and avant-garde movements; American cinema in the age of the studio system; Italian Neorealism; the post-war avant-garde.
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VISST 3176 : Global Cinema II
Crosslisted as: PMA 3551, PMA 6551 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history.
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ARTH 3225 : Archaic & Classical Greece
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3225, CLASS 3735 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.
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ARTH 3250 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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VISST 3342 : Human Perception: Application to Computer Graphics, Art, and Visual Display
Crosslisted as: COGST 3420, PSYCH 3420, PSYCH 6420 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Our present technology allows us to transmit and display information through a variety of media. To make the most of these media channels, it is important to consider the limitations and abilities of the human observer. The course considers a number of applied aspects of human perception with an emphasis on the display of visual information. Topics include "three-dimensional" display systems, color theory, spatial and temporal limitations of the visual systems, attempts at subliminal communication, and "visual" effects in film and television.
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ARTH 3419 : Rembrandt's Circle: Global Dutch - Travel and Trade in Africa, the Americas, Asia
Crosslisted as: VISST 3419 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The variety of visual experience in 17th-century Dutch art is legion: still life, portraiture and self-portraiture, landscape and cityscape, architectural painting and scenes of everyday life, all in paint and print. New scientific technologies and trade routes, a proto-capitalist economy and highly networked society also place their mark on the cultural and artistic production in the Netherlands. This semester we will investigate the extraordinary global reach of the Dutch to both east and west, resulting in trade and luxury goods, new knowledge of peoples, flora, and fauna—considered marvelous—as well as encounters with and portrayals of difference. As they leave their marks on the visual, we will explore Africa and the African slave trade; East Asia, specifically Taiwan and Japan; South America, notably Brazil; New Amsterdam; Jakarta and Indonesia. Where available, we will address how indigenous peoples portrayed the Dutch. The course will involve meetings at the Johnson Museum.
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ARTH 3440 : Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael, and their World
Crosslisted as: VISST 3443 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael transformed the art of their time. Leonardo was an extraordinary thinker, scientist, and engineer as well as artist. Michelangelo invented grandiose projects for ambitious patrons and created a novel visual language with parallels to his poetry, and in his later years, profoundly spiritual images. Raphael, the consummate court artist, antiquarian, and archaeologist, produced a new classical style. Leonardo and Michelangelo pioneered new approaches to the study and representation of the human body. They deployed wit and humor and reinvented the grotesque from ancient art, and all influenced the proliferation of erotic art. Biographies presented them as geniuses, leading the Florentine sculptor Cellini to model himself in his autobiography on a larger-than-life Michelangelo. Florentine painters and sculptors grappled with Michelangelo's enormous inventiveness. We will also examine prints in the Johnson Museum after Michelangelo and Raphael, and consider recent attributions of new discoveries to them.
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VISST 3463 : Contemporary Television
Crosslisted as: AMST 3463, PMA 3463 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course considers issues, approaches, and complexities in the contemporary television landscape. As television has changed drastically over the past fifteen years, this course provides students with a deeper understanding of the changes in narratives, technologies, forms, and platforms that structure/restructure the televisual world. Students will grapple with how "new media" forms such as web-series and on-demand internet streaming services have changed primetime television. We will balance our look at television shows with nuanced readings about the televisual media industry. By watching, analyzing, and critiquing the powerful medium of television, students will situate their understanding within a broader consideration of the medium's regulation, production, distribution, and reception in the network and post-network era.
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ARTH 3505 : Blaxploitation Film and Photography
Crosslisted as: AMST 3515, ASRC 3505, FGSS 3505, PMA 3505, VISST 3505 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Blaxploitation films of the 1970s are remembered for their gigantic Afros, enormous guns, slammin' soundtracks, sex, drugs, nudity, and violence. Never before or since have so many African American performers been featured in starring roles. Macho male images were projected alongside strong, yet sexually submissive female ones. But how did these images affect the roles that black men and women played on and off the screen and the portrayal of the black body in contemporary society? This interdisciplinary course explores the range of ideas and methods used by critical thinkers in addressing the body in art, film, photography and the media. We will consider how the display of the black body affects how we see and interpret the world by examining the construction of beauty, fashion, hairstyles and gendered images as well as sexuality, violence, race, and hip-hop culture.
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ARTH 3510 : African Art and Culture
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3501 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is a survey of the visual artistic traditions of Africa. It investigates the different forms of visual art in relation to their historical and socio-cultural context. The symbolism and complexity of Africa's visual art traditions will be explored through the analysis of myth, ritual and cosmology, and history. In-depth analysis of particular African societies will be used to examine the relationship of the arts to indigenous concepts of time, space, color, form, aesthetics and socio-political order. The course will also investigate the modernist experience in African art. Therefore, art works produced within a modernist, post-modernist perspective, and other contemporary discourses will also be explored. Power Point presentations, films and videos will be used to illustrate material discussed in class.
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VISST 3520 : Light and Image
Crosslisted as: PMA 3520 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Light is the fundamental building block of all visual media. Whether a photographer, filmmaker, videographer, YouTube poster, or other maker of images, the strategic use of light can tell your story better, move your audience more deeply, and shape your composition more effectively. This studio course will take a hands-on approach to exploring different techniques of lighting, including location, kit, and grid systems. We will engage with both aesthetic and technical aspects of light. Students will come away with a deeper understanding of and appreciation for how light fundamentally affects and gives meaning to how we see the world.
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VISST 3560 : Computing Cultures
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3061, COMM 3560, INFO 3561, STS 3561 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.
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ARTH 3565 : Art & Architecture of Colonial Latin America
Crosslisted as: LATA 3565, VISST 3565 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course surveys the artistic and architectural traditions of Latin America during the period of Spanish colonial rule (ca. 1520s-1820s).  It will center on visual cultures of the viceroyalties of New Spain (Mexico) and Peru, but will also incorporate sections on the colonial Caribbean, the northern Andes, and Brazil.  The course explores the legacy of pre-Columbian visual traditions in the colonial era as well as the lasting impact of colonial artistic practices in modern and contemporary Latin America.  It will also examine colonial Latin America as the crossroads of dynamic artistic and cultural interaction between indigenous, European, and African-descended groups.  Topics to be explored include issues of visual translation and transmission, art and agency, and the creation of new colonial artistic practices and idioms.
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ARTH 3566 : Art and Architecture of the Pre-Columbian Americas
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3566, LATA 3566, LSP 3566, VISST 3566 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the arts of the ancient Americas from circa 2000 BC to the Spanish invasions of the 15th and 16th centuries. The inhabitants of the Americas produced outstanding works of art and architecture that showcased their diverse aesthetic contributions.  This course covers the arts of indigenous Mesoamerica (Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras), the Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, and the Greater and Lesser Antilles), and Andean South America (Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Chile).  Students will become familiar with the history, archaeology, and visual arts of the earliest cultures that populated these regions up through the Inca, Aztec, and Maya cultures that encountered the Spaniards.  This course will also explore the legacies of pre-Columbian art in colonial, modern, and contemporary Latin America.
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ARTH 3600 : Contemporary Art: 1960-Present
Crosslisted as: VISST 3600 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course discusses new art practices since the 1960s. Although numerous artistic experiments took place during the first half of the twentieth century, it was with the declining importance of modernist painting and sculpture by the late 1950s that newer modes of artistic practice became established. The course will explore the rise of Fluxus, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Land Art, Video and Performance, Postmodernism, and Postcolonialism. These practices are situated in relation to intellectual and social movements since the 1960s, including counterculture, feminism, race, ecology, institutional critique, and globalization. This course focuses primarily on Western European and North American art, but also incorporates selected global developments.
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VISST 3620 : Lighting Design Studio I
Crosslisted as: PMA 3620 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The theory and practice of lighting design as a medium for artistic expression. This course explores the aesthetic and mechanical aspects of light and their application in a variety of disciplines. Emphasis is on understanding lighting's function in an environment and manipulating light effectively. Artistic style and viewpoint are also covered.
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ARTH 3651 : Women in New Media Art
Crosslisted as: FGSS 3655, VISST 3651 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The work of women artists has been central to the development of new media art. These rich and varied practices include installation, virtual reality environments, net art, digital video, networked performance, tactical media, video games, remix and robotics. This course will begin with an overview of feminist art and early experiments in performance and video art to then investigate multiple currents of digital media. Discussions will focus primarily on works by women artists from Europe, the Americas and Australia.
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VISST 3750 :
Crosslisted as: AAS 3750, AMST 3755, ENGL 3960 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
VISST 3758 : Technology and the Moving Body I
Crosslisted as: PMA 3350, PMA 4350, VISST 4758 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Formally titled "technosomakinesics," this class works to expand the specific aesthetics related to dance as embodied performance. Included in the process is the analysis of built environments that both inspire and are designed to be inhabited by these disciplines. This studio course explores the resulting neoperformance forms being created within the range of digital media processing; such as gallery installations, multimedia dance-theatre, personal interactive media (games and digital art) and web projects. Computer-imaging and sound-production programs are examined and used in the class work (human form-animation software, vocal recording and digital editing, digital-imaging tools. The new context of digital performance raises questions concerning the use of traditional lighting, set, costume, and sound-design techniques that are examined as they are repositioned by digital-translation tools with the goal of creating experimental and/or conceptual multimedia performance and/or installation work. Theoretical texts on dance and theatrical performance, film studies, the dynamic social body, architecture, and digital technology are also used to support conceptual creative work.
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VISST 3760 : American Cinema since 1968
Crosslisted as: AMST 3760, PMA 3560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1968, amongst cultural and political turmoil, the American film industry adopted the ratings system, which helped usher in the kinds of cinema we know today. This course focuses on developments in U.S. cinema since then: its politics, technological and economic transformations, relationship to other media, and changing ways in which people consume it. A main focus will be the aesthetic developments of films themselves: new and changing genres, new visual styles, new ways of storytelling, and ways in which new voices and visions have emerged. Weekly screenings will include mainstream, independent, and documentary films. The course can be taken as a complement to "American Cinema" (AMST 2760) or independently.
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VISST 3798 : Fundamentals of Directing I
Crosslisted as: PMA 3880 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Focused, practical exercises teach the student fundamental staging techniques that bring written text to theatrical life. A core objective is to increase the student's awareness of why and how certain stage events communicate effectively to an audience. Each student directs a number of exercises as well as a short scene.
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ARTH 3800 : Introduction to the Arts of China
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3800, ASIAN 3383 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers a survey of the art and culture of China, from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. We begin with an inquiry into the meaning of national boundaries and the controversy of the Han Chinese people, which helps us identify the scope of Chinese culture. Pre-dynastic (or prehistoric) Chinese culture is presented through both legends about the origins of the Chinese, and scientifically excavated artifacts. Art of the dynastic and modern periods is presented in light of contemporaneous social, political, geographical, philosophical and religious contexts. Students work directly with objects in the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.
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ARTH 3850 : The Arts of Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3350, VISST 3696 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The arts of Southeast Asia are studied in their social context, since in traditional societies creative processes are often mapped on the sequence of events that compose human lives. We will be looking particularly at the gendered ways in which bodies are mapped on the land, and how these various framings are often reflected in the unique relationships that emerge between works of art and textual sources.
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ARTH 3902 : Curatorial Interventions
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6902 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The intersectionality between the political landscapes of nation spaces, economic and political forces will be undertaken through curatorial practices for museums and the art market including international biennials. What is the value in considering internal nation-state and Indigenous relationships on the international scene through artistic expression? Can this kind of international art world attention divulge anything missed in more direct political engagement? Reconsider curating practice as an intervention in the role museums and art world spaces play in the process of decolonization and the flow of cultural knowledge. Structured as a tutorial, this is a reading and discussion intensive course with limited enrollment.
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ARTH 3940 : The Photobook
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6940 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The history of photography as an art has been mostly on the page, not on the wall.  This course refocuses the standard museum and gallery history of photography back to the book.  Significantly, it takes advantage, through field trips, of the proximity of Cornell to the George Eastman House in Rochester, whose library houses the most important photobooks from around the world, including the best creations from Russia, Japan, and the United States.  Students will learn the basics of photographic printing, book construction, the role of the photobook in the rise of the artist's book in the twentieth century, as well as advanced skills in analysis of the photographic picture and sequencing.  Major themes will include the scientific photobook of the nineteenth century, the documentary photobook of the 1930s, the propaganda photobook of the communist era, the postwar photobooks of Japan, the personal/domestic turn of the 1970s, and the present state of the photobook in the digital era. 
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ARTH 4101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6101, VISST 4101 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
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ARTH 4107 : The Museum and the Object
Crosslisted as: VISST 4607 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Gives advanced students the opportunity to work directly with original objects from the collection in the Herbert F. Johnson Museum. Focuses on art and connoisseurship by questioning the ways quality is determined in works of art. Topics include methods of attribution, fakes and forgeries, techniques and media, restoration and conservation, art education and theories of perception. Session leaders include the curatorial staff of the art museum.
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ARTH 4151 : Topics in Media Arts
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6151, STS 4511, STS 6511, VISST 4151, VISST 6151 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Topic for Fall 2018: Biological Art (Bio Art): From the late 20th-century to the present, artists have made art using live entities including plants, animals, cells, tissue cultures and bacteria. They have designed habitats, crops, body organs, created new species and attempted to salvage extinct ones. Some artists also have produced works in traditional media such as painting, sculpture and photography. While artists always have imaged and sometimes directly engaged with aspects of the natural world in their art, bio art responds to recent developments in genetics and information technologies. Because of its foundation on the life sciences this art entails significant ethical and political dimensions. In this seminar students will explore multiple areas of bio art with attention to pertinent artistic and critical literature and to the scientific practices in which the works are based. For this purpose the class will consult with specialists and visit laboratories on campus relevant to the art covered in the course. We expect these interdisciplinary investigations to prepare students for a grounded assessment of bio art.
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ARTH 4155 : Topics in Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6155, LATA 4155, LATA 6155, VISST 4155, VISST 6155 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will investigate question such, such as: How does the inclusion of technologically engaged practices in the history of Latin American art challenge our understanding of this art? Are there regional specificities to the use and understanding of media technologies? Are modern technologies relevant to the representation of national identities? Has the dissemination of digital technologies contributed to preserve cultural memory? To what extent do technologically engaged practices contribute to indigenous social movements and aesthetics? To what extent do contemporary media artists invoke the indigenous and colonial past in their work? Is Latin American digital art indifferent to social realities? Are existing theories of globalization and comparative modernities adequate to understand this work? Can artists' engagements with technology stimulate the development of new historical and critical discourses about Latin American art? Diverse disciplinary and methodological approaches will be included and welcomed.
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ARTH 4160 : Topics in Colonial Encounters
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6160, LATA 4160, LATA 6160, VISST 4160 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The colonial period in Latin America (circa 1521-1820s) witnessed the formation of one of the most diverse societies in the world.  Labor regimes, religious activities, marriage alliances, and commercial contacts engendered by the Spanish colonial enterprise brought Spaniards, Africans, and Indigenous peoples into dynamic contact.  This cross-fertilization of cultures resulted in the construction of new cultural categories and colonial identities whose reverberations continue to be felt into the present day.  This seminar explores the role that visual culture played in the articulation of identity in Latin America.  For the purposes of this seminar, "identity" can be loosely defined as the overlapping allegiances to which one ascribes, whether racial, cultural, gendered, religious, or community-based.  The visual culture of colonial Latin America can reveal multitudes on the construction of self and community across temporal and geographical contexts.  We will explore a variety of colonial Latin American objects and images, including paintings, textiles, and material culture.  Our discussions of images will be guided by readings on hybridity, coloniality, cross-cultural exchange, and the early modern Atlantic world.
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ARTH 4162 : The Inca Empire and its Colonial Legacies
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4162, ARKEO 6162, ARTH 6162, LATA 4162, LATA 6162, VISST 4162 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the art and architecture of the Inca Empire (ca. 1438-1532), the largest indigenous empire in the Americas prior to the Spanish conquest. The first half of the course explores architecture, monuments, and portable arts from Cuzco, the capital of the empire, as well as smaller coastal and highland cities, to understand the complexities of Inca imperial aesthetics and their role in the administration of nearly 10 million inhabitants along the Andes mountain chain of South America. The second half of the course examines artistic production in modern-day Peru, Bolivia, and Chile during the period of Spanish colonial rule (1532-1824). Special attention will be given to the visual codification of collective memories of the Incas during the post-conquest era.
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ARTH 4171 : 19th Century Art and Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An examination and analysis of the major trends in art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Post Impressionism and the dawn of the twentieth century. Lectures and readings will concentrate on the historical context of great masterpieces by seminal artists. The class will investigate the imagery and theoretical foundation of nineteenth-century European and American art using a selection of appropriate methodological approaches. Major figures to be discussed include David, Copley, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Cole, Manet, Morisot, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Rodin, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Part of each class will be devoted to discussions of the readings. Two classes will be held in the National Gallery of Art at times and dates to be determined. Exams, a term paper, and class participation will be used for evaluative purposes.
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ARTH 4171 : 19th Century Art and Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An examination and analysis of the major trends in art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Post Impressionism and the dawn of the twentieth century. Lectures and readings will concentrate on the historical context of great masterpieces by seminal artists. The class will investigate the imagery and theoretical foundation of nineteenth-century European and American art using a selection of appropriate methodological approaches. Major figures to be discussed include David, Copley, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Cole, Manet, Morisot, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Rodin, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Part of each class will be devoted to discussions of the readings. Two classes will be held in the National Gallery of Art at times and dates to be determined. Exams, a term paper, and class participation will be used for evaluative purposes.
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ARTH 4233 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4233, ARKEO 6233, ARTH 6233, CLASS 4746, CLASS 7746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Fall 18 topic: Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Art and Archaeology of the Roman provinces as a 'sub-field' of Roman Archaeology has only recently gained traction in US academia, whereas in many European countries it still provides master narratives for national(ist) histories. Yet, in the wake of post-colonialism, the Roman provinces have proven fertile ground for more critical and theoretically informed archaeologies and art histories. What still needs more attention is the connectivity across provinces. The seminar therefore adopts a deliberately decentralized perspective. In looking at landscapes; infra-structure; production sites; military camps; the country side; urban centers; the material culture of domestic life and of the funerary realm, of religion, of gender and ethnicity we will emphasize interaction beyond or evading Rome. Rather than offering a systematic overview, the seminar proposes several lines of inquiry. Their main purpose is to interrogate the validity of several boundaries (geographical, methodological, theoretical, historiographical and institutional) that continue to define the field.
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ARTH 4353 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from  prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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VISST 4436 : Topics in Indian Film
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4436, PMA 4536 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The course will treat various aspects of Indian film, with focal topics to vary from year to year.  These topics will include religion in Indian film, Indian art films, and the golden age of Indian film.  All topics will be discussed in relation to the conventions of mainstream Bollywood cinema and their social and cultural significance.  Each week a film must be viewed to prepare for class discussion; screenings will be arranged as appropriate. No knowledge of an Indian language is needed.
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ARTH 4514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Tradition
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6514, ASRC 4514, ASRC 6514 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the intersection of Africana/Black Studies and Postcolonial Studies.  Although the two fields are often perceived as being distinct from one another, in reality they overlap in significant ways as the result of the immense contributions of African and African Diaspora theorists and intellectuals to the rise and evolution of postcolonial studies. Course readings include original texts by theorists and scholars such as Frantz Fanon, Aimé Cesaire, W E B DuBois, Richard Wright, Edouard Glissant, C.L.R. James, Amilcar Cabral, Sylvia Winters, in addition to Nawal Sadawi, Edward Said,and Gayatri Spivak among others. We will explore the contributions made to both fields by feminist, gender, race, and sexuality studies.
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ARTH 4558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4558, ARKEO 6558, ARTH 6558, JWST 4558, JWST 6558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how memory has been expressed in Jewish tradition in physical and spatial form, especially though the creation of commemorative objects, records, markers, monuments and museums. The second half of the class will focus on creation, design, use, and reception of Holocaust memorials and museums, and broader "landscapes of memory" including engagement in several ongoing memorial projects.  We will consider question such as: Who makes memory objects and why? Who visits memory sites and how does their meaning change over time or with different audiences? Where and how do individual and collective commemoration events intersect?  Beginning with Holocaust monuments and museums in Europe, Israel and America, we will look back on older traditions of commemoration in Jewish tradition and compare and link these – as in the case of ancient tombs, 20th century war memorials and Holocaust museums - to broader commemorative trends and artistic tastes.
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VISST 4563 : Lighting Design Studio II
Crosslisted as: PMA 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Concentrates on designing lighting for different genres of performance in various venues. Emphasis is placed on developing both the visual sophistication and the technical artistry of the lighting designer. Commitment, personal style, and professional presentation are stressed.
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ARTH 4578 : African Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4502 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ARTH 4606 : Rembrandt: Flesh Paint Performance
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6606 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Rembrandt was typical and exceptional in seventeenth-century Holland: typical because subject to the same market forces as others, and exceptional because he flouted that market, alienated patrons, innovating at every step. Both highly regarded and greatly reviled in his time, modern scholars have understood Rembrandt's work variously: saying that "every generation creates its own Rembrandt." We will attempt to determine what Rembrandt is ours.
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VISST 4620 : Undocumentation
Crosslisted as: AMST 4620, COML 4616, FGSS 4620, LATA 4620, LSP 4621, ROMS 4625, SHUM 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will sustain a particular reading of post-1984 Mexico-US border cultural production as "undocumentation." Specifically, we will focus on performance, conceptual, and cinematic practices that corrupt the spreadsheet and the exposé; that reflect their makers' commitments to portraying extreme labor situations in a period of greater Mexican neoliberal transition now synonymous with NAFTA, culture and drug wars, and border militarization and maquilization. Assigned texts will include artwork by the Border Art Workshop and Elizabeth Sisco, Louis Hock, and David Avalos; writing by Gloria Anzaldúa, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Sara Uribe, and Sergio González Rodríguez; contributions to the Tijuana-San Diego installation festival inSITE; and "undocumentaries" like Alex Rivera's Borders Trilogy, Sergio De La Torre and Vicki Funari's Maquilapolis, and Natalia Almada's El Velador.
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VISST 4758 : Technology and the Moving Body II
Crosslisted as: PMA 3350, PMA 4350, VISST 3758 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of PMA 3350. PMA 4350 expands on principles explored in PMA 3350 using more complex and interactive software and spatialities. Students must create work utilizing projections and built objects or interactive web based projects.
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VISST 4793 : Advanced Film and Video Projects
Crosslisted as: PMA 4585 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A continuation of PMA 3570, Introduction to Visual Storytelling, students will dive deeper into creating story driven short form narratives. Students will have the opportunity to develop and produce a short film over the course of the semester.  The expectation is the follow through of the filmmaking process, from story development, preproduction, production, post production and distribution. Students are expected to collaborate heavily and crew on each other's film productions, in various roles. Final film projects will be screened in a public, open-campus event at the end of the semester.
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ARTH 4816 : Modern Chinese Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6816, ASIAN 4473, ASIAN 6673 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
China, a cultural giant of East Asia, made a passive entrance into modernity. With the advent of Western and American colonialism and imperialism, coupled with recent successes in westernization by the Japanese, Chinese artists had to redefine their roles as well as their visions. This turmoil bore witness to a vibrant beginning in modern Chinese art. Interactions between the Chinese themselves, and Chinese interactions with foreigners in the major cities of Shanghai and Beijing, fostered new directions in Chinese art and helped shape western visions of Chinese art history. Issues covered include: Chinese debates on western influence--their theoretical foundations and rationales; New visions for the future of Chinese art in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Pluralistic approaches and arguments on "Chinese identity" in the modern era; Collecting art and the vision of history; The identity of traditional literati painters in the modern era-their roles, artworks, and deeds; Foreigners in China-the formation of major European collections of Chinese art, and the formation of "Chinese art history" in the West.
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ARTH 4820 : Art in Zen and Zen in Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6820, ASIAN 4450, ASIAN 6650 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores how the art of Zen (Chan) developed in China and was transmitted to Korea and Japan. It will also examine how ideas of Zen informed Western Modern art in both Europe and North America, and how these artistic ideas in turn influenced postwar abstract art in many parts of the world.
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ARTH 4851 : Performing Objects/Collecting Cultures
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6851, ASIAN 4445, ASIAN 6645, VISST 4851 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The twin phenomena of performing and collecting are as old as time, and both require an intense entanglement with things. This seminar examines the significance of objects and their related texts within the field of Art History and, indeed, more broadly as they are "performed" and "collected" (sometimes both initiatives occurring simultaneously) in Asian Art and Culture. Various performative and collective containments will be mapped as they transcend boundaries: temporal, spatial, cultural, intertexual, and disciplinary.  Masked dances and their costume elements, clay pots, bronzes, serpentine daggers, musical instruments, embroidered story cloths, shadow puppets, flora, fauna, and film will be explored.
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ARTH 4854 : Water: Art & Politics in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6854, ASIAN 4499, ASIAN 6699, VISST 4854, VISST 6854 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will focus on the significance of water –economic, religious, political, social –and its role in the art and architecture of Mainland and Island Southeast Asia, with particular focus on Cambodia and Indonesia. While India and China can be seen to provide aquatic themes and patterns for transformation, the emphasis in this course will focus on local ingenuity, how technologies of water use and control at ancient sites in Southeast Asia can be seen to shape vivid symbologies, performing past and present. The course will be taught at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum with guest lectures presented by Visiting Scholar, Dr. Ea Darith.
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VISST 4945 : Body Politics in African Literature and Cinema
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4995, COML 4945, ENGL 4995, FGSS 4945, LGBT 4945 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course examines how postcolonial African writers and filmmakers engage with and revise controversial images of bodies and sexuality--genital cursing, same-sex desire, HIV/AIDS, genital surgeries, etc. Our inquiry also surveys African theorists' troubling of problematic tropes and practices such as the conception in 19th-century racist writings of the colonized as embodiment, the pathologization and hypersexualization of colonized bodies, and the precarious and yet empowering nature of the body and sexuality in the postcolonial African experience. As we focus on African artists and theorists, we also read American and European theorists, including but not certainly limited to Giorgio Agamben, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and Joseph Slaughter, detecting the ways in which discourses around bodies in the African context may shape contemporary theories and vice versa.
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ARTH 4991 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 4992 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 4998 : Honors Work I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A course for senior Art History majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the History of Art faculty.
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ARTH 4999 : Honors Work II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The student under faculty direction prepares a senior thesis.
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ARTH 5991 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5992 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5993 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5994 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 6000 : Graduate Research Methods in Art History
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar introduces graduate students to a range of methodologies and approaches to teaching and researching topics in art history and visual studies. Each week, a member of the faculty will present his or her work to the seminar, highlighting unique research approaches, areas of specialty, technological challenges, and professional and pedagogical rewards. Topics include defining a research question; conducting archival research and fieldwork; syllabus design; identifying funding sources; and grant proposal writing. This course is required for all art history Ph.D. students and open to graduate students from other departments. Students are encouraged to use current technologies for presenting their coursework, including the creation of a blog for documenting ongoing research questions related to their teaching and dissertation.
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ARTH 6101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4101, VISST 4101 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
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ARTH 6151 : Topics in Media Arts
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4151, STS 4511, STS 6511, VISST 4151, VISST 6151 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Seminar topics rotate each semester.
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ARTH 6155 : Topics in Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4155, LATA 4155, LATA 6155, VISST 4155, VISST 6155 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will investigate question such, such as: How does the inclusion of technologically engaged practices in the history of Latin American art challenge our understanding of this art? Are there regional specificities to the use and understanding of media technologies? Are modern technologies relevant to the representation of national identities? Has the dissemination of digital technologies contributed to preserve cultural memory? To what extent do technologically engaged practices contribute to indigenous social movements and aesthetics? To what extent do contemporary media artists invoke the indigenous and colonial past in their work? Is Latin American digital art indifferent to social realities? Are existing theories of globalization and comparative modernities adequate to understand this work? Can artists' engagements with technology stimulate the development of new historical and critical discourses about Latin American art? Diverse disciplinary and methodological approaches will be included and welcomed.
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ARTH 6160 : Topics in Colonial Encounters
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4160, LATA 4160, LATA 6160, VISST 4160 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The colonial period in Latin America (circa 1521-1820s) witnessed the formation of one of the most diverse societies in the world.  Labor regimes, religious activities, marriage alliances, and commercial contacts engendered by the Spanish colonial enterprise brought Spaniards, Africans, and Indigenous peoples into dynamic contact.  This cross-fertilization of cultures resulted in the construction of new cultural categories and colonial identities whose reverberations continue to be felt into the present day.  This seminar explores the role that visual culture played in the articulation of identity in Latin America.  For the purposes of this seminar, "identity" can be loosely defined as the overlapping allegiances to which one ascribes, whether racial, cultural, gendered, religious, or community-based.  The visual culture of colonial Latin America can reveal multitudes on the construction of self and community across temporal and geographical contexts.  We will explore a variety of colonial Latin American objects and images, including paintings, textiles, and material culture.  Our discussions of images will be guided by readings on hybridity, coloniality, cross-cultural exchange, and the early modern Atlantic world.
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ARTH 6162 : The Inca Empire and its Colonial Legacies
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4162, ARKEO 6162, ARTH 4162, LATA 4162, LATA 6162, VISST 4162 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the art and architecture of the Inca Empire (ca. 1438-1532), the largest indigenous empire in the Americas prior to the Spanish conquest. The first half of the course explores architecture, monuments, and portable arts from Cuzco, the capital of the empire, as well as smaller coastal and highland cities, to understand the complexities of Inca imperial aesthetics and their role in the administration of nearly 10 million inhabitants along the Andes mountain chain of South America. The second half of the course examines artistic production in modern-day Peru, Bolivia, and Chile during the period of Spanish colonial rule (1532-1824). Special attention will be given to the visual codification of collective memories of the Incas during the post-conquest era.
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ARTH 6233 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4233, ARKEO 6233, ARTH 4233, CLASS 4746, CLASS 7746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Topics rotate each semester.  Fall 18 topic: Archaeology of the Roman Provincs.
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ARTH 6353 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, CLASS 4755, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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ARTH 6514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Tradition
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4514, ASRC 4514, ASRC 6514 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the intersection of Africana/Black Studies and Postcolonial Studies.  Although the two fields are often perceived as being distinct from one another, in reality they overlap in significant ways as the result of the immense contributions of African and African Diaspora theorists and intellectuals to the rise and evolution of postcolonial studies. Course readings include original texts by theorists and scholars such as Frantz Fanon, Aimé Cesaire, W E B DuBois, Albert Memmi, Edouard Glissant, Leopold Cedar Senghor, C.L.R. James, Amilcar Cabral, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o in addition to Nawal Sadawi, Edward Said,and Gayatri Spivak among others.  In addition, we will explore the contributions made to both fields by feminist, gender, race, and sexuality studies.
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ARTH 6548 : City-Scapes of the Late Ottoman Empire
Crosslisted as: HIST 6548, NES 6548 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar is intended for Graduate students who are interested in exploring notions of space and place within the context of the late Ottoman Empire. Going beyond the examination of the "Islamic city" this seminar will bring theoretical readings about place making, in Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East, to bear on the late Ottoman case. From the urban frontiers of the empire to the capital, Istanbul, this seminar will tackle the latest in historical research on the late Ottoman Empire's parks, public monuments, city planning, public/private space, Ottoman official buildings, the "Turkish house," the "Arab house," city soundscapes, amongst others. We will critically examine how recent studies are re-shaping historians' knowledge of urban spaces and mental map of this vast empire.
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ARTH 6558 : Shaping Jewish Memory: Monuments, Memorials and Museums
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4558, ARKEO 6558, ARTH 4558, JWST 4558, JWST 6558 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how memory has been expressed in Jewish tradition in physical and spatial form, especially though the creation of commemorative objects, records, markers, monuments and museums. The second half of the class will focus on creation, design, use, and reception of Holocaust memorials and museums, and broader "landscapes of memory" including engagement in several ongoing memorial projects.  We will consider question such as: Who makes memory objects and why? Who visits memory sites and how does their meaning change over time or with different audiences? Where and how do individual and collective commemoration events intersect?  Beginning with Holocaust monuments and museums in Europe, Israel and America, we will look back on older traditions of commemoration in Jewish tradition and compare and link these – as in the case of ancient tombs, 20th century war memorials and Holocaust museums - to broader commemorative trends and artistic tastes.
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ARTH 6606 : Rembrandt: Flesh Paint Performance
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4606 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Rembrandt was typical and exceptional in seventeenth-century Holland: typical because subject to the same market forces as others, and exceptional because he flouted that market, alienated patrons, innovating at every step. Both highly regarded and greatly reviled in his time, modern scholars have understood Rembrandt's work variously, saying that "every generation creates its own Rembrandt." We will attempt to determine what Rembrandt is ours.
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ARTH 6730 : Ekphrasis: The Art of Description from Homer to Anne Carson
Crosslisted as: CLASS 6736, COML 6736 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the use of "speech that brings the subject matter vividly before the eyes." Known in classical antiquity as ekphrasis, this trope has received intense attention in recent decades across the fields of classical philology, art history, and literary studies. Setting ekphrasis within its broad context of use within antiquity (from rhetorical handbooks and speeches to epic poetry, epigrams, and technical treatises), we will trace the process by which the term has come to refer specifically to descriptions of works of art. From Homer's shield of Achilles to the vivid descriptions of the Greek novel, this 'sub-genre' of ekphrasis has also enjoyed a rich reception in later western literature, from Keats and Browning to Ashbery and Carson. Students will be encouraged to explore ekphrastic techniques across genres, cultures, and periods (and to practice writing ekphraseis themselves), whilst also considering the degree to which the discipline of art history is grounded in ekphrastic practice. All literature will be available in translation.
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ARTH 6816 : Modern Chinese Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4816, ASIAN 4473, ASIAN 6673 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
China, a cultural giant of East Asia, made a passive entrance into modernity. With the advent of Western and American colonialism and imperialism, coupled with recent successes in westernization by the Japanese, Chinese artists had to redefine their roles as well as their visions. This turmoil bore witness to a vibrant beginning in modern Chinese art. Interactions between the Chinese themselves, and Chinese interactions with foreigners in the major cities of Shanghai and Beijing, fostered new directions in Chinese art and helped shape western visions of Chinese art history. Issues covered include: Chinese debates on western influence--their theoretical foundations and rationales; New visions for the future of Chinese art in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Pluralistic approaches and arguments on "Chinese identity" in the modern era; Collecting art and the vision of history; The identity of traditional literati painters in the modern era-their roles, artworks, and deeds; Foreigners in China-the formation of major European collections of Chinese art, and the formation of "Chinese art history" in the West.
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ARTH 6820 : Art in Zen and Zen in Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4820, ASIAN 4450, ASIAN 6650 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores how the art of Zen (Chan) developed in China and was transmitted to Korea and Japan. It will also examine how ideas of Zen informed Western Modern art in both Europe and North America, and how these artistic ideas in turn influenced postwar abstract art in many parts of the world.
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Description
ARTH 6851 : Performing Objects/Collecting Cultures
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4851, ASIAN 4445, ASIAN 6645, VISST 4851 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The twin phenomena of performing and collecting are as old as time, and both require an intense entanglement with things. This seminar examines the significance of objects and their related texts within the field of Art History and, indeed, more broadly as they are "performed" and "collected" (sometimes both initiatives occurring simultaneously) in Asian Art and Culture. Various performative and collective containments will be mapped as they transcend boundaries: temporal, spatial, cultural, intertexual, and disciplinary. Masked dances and their costume elements, clay pots, bronzes, serpentine daggers, musical instruments, embroidered story cloths, shadow puppets, flora, fauna, and film will be explored.
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ARTH 6854 : Water: Art & Politics in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4854, ASIAN 4499, ASIAN 6699, VISST 4854, VISST 6854 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will focus on the significance of water –economic, religious, political, social –and its role in the art and architecture of Mainland and Island Southeast Asia, with particular focus on Cambodia and Indonesia. While India and China can be seen to provide aquatic themes and patterns for transformation, the emphasis in this course will focus on local ingenuity, how technologies of water use and control at ancient sites in Southeast Asia can be seen to shape vivid symbologies, performing past and present. The course will be taught at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum with guest lectures presented by Visiting Scholar, Dr. Ea Darith.
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ARTH 6902 : Curatorial Interventions
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3902 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The intersectionality between the political landscapes of nation spaces, economic and political forces will be undertaken through curatorial practices for museums and the art market including international biennials. What is the value in considering internal nation-state and Indigenous relationships on the international scene through artistic expression? Can this kind of international art world attention divulge anything missed in more direct political engagement? Reconsider curating practice as an intervention in the role museums and art world spaces play in the process of decolonization and the flow of cultural knowledge. Structured as a tutorial, this is a reading and discussion intensive course with limited enrollment.
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ARTH 6940 : The Photobook
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3940 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
For description, see ARTH 3940.
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